TypeToString Function in VB5

The TypeToString function uses the copytype.dll with the following parameters:  address of the type, return string, bytes to return.  For instance, I create a user-defined type that contains 3 variables, each of which are strings of 10 bytes.  When I call the TypeToString function, I will pass this type (automatically by reference), a string variable name, and 30 (number of bytes to return).  While I can use this function without issue in VB 3.0 and 4.0, I cannot in VB 5.0.  I would guess that the copytype.dll is only 16-bit and incompatible.  Regardless, I would like to know if VB 5.0 offers the equivalent functionality.

I appreciate your time and attention to this matter.
-David
dfhainesAsked:
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mirkConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Ok, the *easiest* way to do this in VB5, is to use
the LSET function, but this means you have to create
another User Defined Type to "copy" the strings into, like
this: Lset TypeWith1StringOf30Chars = TypeWith3StringsOf10Chars

Another way to do it would be to write the type to a file,
then read it back into your string.

Hope this is helpful - Mirk.
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mrmickCommented:
Mirk, LSet would only work in this manner when copying fixed length strings because strings variables not of a fixed length contain pointers to string data.  LSet can be used to copy a  structure (a number of bytes beginning at the offset of the first element) to another structure; however, VB won't copy data referred to by pointers.

dfhaines, you might find it easiest to write a VB function for each different structure (type) that packs its data into a string and perhaps a complementary UnPack function to re-populate the structure from the data packed into a string).

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dfhainesAuthor Commented:
Mirk,
Thank you for your quick response.  The LSET function was sufficient and your advice helped automate a previously manually-intensive production task.  I do wonder, though, if the TypeToString function will be written for VB 5.0.  Perhaps you would agree that it would be a more efficient way to copy types to strings and would require less overhead.
Thanks again,
David
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mirkCommented:
Yes, David, I agree... but thinking about it, another answer
could be to use a memory-copy function from the KERNEL...
My feelings are that this would be dangerous though.

Glad to have helped - Mirk


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