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Breaking through HAL

Posted on 1998-04-08
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10
I need to store various structures at specific addresses on and Windows NT machine.  Unfortunately Windows NT had a Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) which seems to prevent me from doing this.  Is there a way to break through HAL or at least get around it so that I can do this?  I need help fast
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Question by:jerm
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by:nietod
ID: 1184119
What do you mean by "store various sturcutres at specific addresses"?  Windows 95 and NT use virtual memory.  You cannot have dirrect access to physical memory. But you should not need dirrect access to physical memory.  Why do you want to do this?
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by:jerm
ID: 1184120
Actually I am reusing old code which uses direct IO (access to physical memory) to share data between two computers running real time applications.  I understand that Win95 and NT do not like this, but was hoping to be able to use the old code without many changes.

Is this possible
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nietod earned 50 total points
ID: 1184121
No.  

But with some work you can make it work.  Try using a memory mapped file instead.
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by:nietod
ID: 1184122
Use the CreateFileMapping() API.  You will probably want to use a "named" mapping so the two programs can use the same mapping.  (The other option is to pass a handle from one program to the other, but this usually requires that the one program starts the other running.  I don't know if that's the case you have.)  

I hope this help gets you started.  Ask if you have any questions.
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by:piano_boxer
ID: 1184123
One simple answer:
You need to write a device driver.
Its not that hard, try looking at the samples from the Win32 device driver kit.

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