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Copying Win95 from disk to disk

Posted on 1998-04-15
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I just purshased a new Hard Drive.  I hooked them both into the system.  One drive c: and the other d: now problems
I tried to Xcopy32 c:\*.* d: /s  it seemed to work, until I tried to boot the new drive.  I got the Win95 screen the the system defaulted to the c: prompt.  

My Question is hows does one copy a image of Win95 and copy it to another drive intact.
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Question by:dsprad
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tstaddon earned 100 total points
ID: 1755500
this isn't as simple as it sounds!

The correct command line is

xcopy32 c:\*,* d:\ /e /h /f

/e specifies to copy every directory, even if empty.
/h copies system files as well.
/f forces long filename display

Theoretically this'll work.

You will need to swap drives over so D becomes C and your old drive becomes D. You will also need to set your new drive as the bootable one (using FDISK).

There is software around, like Drivecopy, which will do the job better than xcopy.
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by:dsprad
ID: 1755501
I forgot to mension the old drive is 345MB and the new drive is 2.0GB
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by:jlove1
ID: 1755502
TST's answer will NOT work, as you will either have the files OPEN (if you're running win95) OR you'll LOSE your long filenames (if you've booted to dos).

I have a more thorough solution.

First Download DOSLFNBK.EXE
from - http://www8.pair.com/dmurdoch/programs/doslfn22.zip

Unzip this program to some directory in your path (OR just unzip it to c:\)
next, boot to DOS (NOT a Dos windows, but DOS, E.G - Hitting f8 on startup and choosing command prompt only)

Then go to c:\ and type the following command
doslfnbk c:\

when that is finished type the following command

xcopy c:\*.* d:\ /e /h

then type

sys d:

then go to d:\ and type

doslfnbk /r d:\


There you have it.. This will work, provided that the D:\ drive is the new hard drive, and c:\ is the old hard drive.
I assume (judging from the problem) that you've already gotten the second harddrive partitioned correctly, and formatted.

after this fix, you should be able to switch the hd's around (or remove the small one) and boot seamlessly into win95.

If this is what you were needing to know, let me know and I'll re-submit it as a question.
ThanX
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by:jlove1
ID: 1755503
I forgot to add 2 crucial steps onto the END of my description. Whenever you're DONE with the above, and before you reboot, type the following.

deltree d:\msdos.sys
(enter YES at the prompt)

attrib c:\msdos.sys -r -a -s -h

copy msdos.sys d:\
...

The old way should work, under MOST circumstances, but this new addition will GUARANTEE that it will work.

Like I said, let me know
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by:dsprad
ID: 1755504
Thanks, this what I needed to know
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by:jlove1
ID: 1755505
so WHO'se answer worked?
I think I need the points (or some anyway) if my answer worked....
:-p
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