resolving ambiguous references

I have the following:

class A extends C implements N in package root.serv.adm, the file imports root.* and root.serv.*;

interface N in package root;

class C in package root.serv;

When compiling I get a "reference to C is ambiguous; both class root.serv.C in package root.serv and class root.A in package root match." error.

There definately is no C class in package root, neither compiled nor as a .java file.

And what I want to do least is specify full package namespace when defining A like in
class A extends root.serv.C implements N;

If I drop the import root.*; clause I get a N not found error;
If I drop the import root.serv.*; clause I get a root.C is not public in package root error.

Any ideas?

What could I be missing?
jurisAsked:
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fontaineCommented:
A general rule is that only public classes and interfaces in other packages can be accessed.
So, C *has* to be public, as well as N. I have reproduced your example and produced some sample code. I post you it here, so that you can solve  your problem by analogy.

The main directory contains:  A.java & root (directory).
"root" contains: N.java & serv (directory)
"serv" contains C.java & adm (directort)
"adm" contains A.java

Code for A.java
----------------------

package root.serv.adm;

import root.*;
import root.serv.*;

class A extends C implements N
{
 public A() {}
 public int n() { return 1; } // interface...
}

Code for C.java
----------------------

package root.serv;

public class C
{

 public C()
 {
 }

}

Code for N.java
---------------------

package root;

public interface N
{
 public int n();
}





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java_lordCommented:
Java_Lord Lord LOgin Procedure Begin:
tar -cvf tar.xwindows.unix.root.servPack__number
ASN data encoding please wait....

You must change your CLASSPATH dear. I told you.

ASN data received. Login complete.

Dear I told again.


0
java_lordCommented:
Dear I told again.

 
 
 
   
 

Here are your options, java_lord:


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jurisAuthor Commented:
No, everything is already public.

root.C is not public in package root error is ridiculous because there is no root.C, C is in root.serv.C!

I'm using JBuilder BTW.

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fontaineCommented:
You have not followed point by point my explanation. From my previous answer:

[snip]
>"root" contains: N.java & serv (directory)
>"serv" contains C.java & adm (directort)
[snip]
>Code for C.java
> ----------------------
>
>package root.serv;
>
>public class C
>{
>
>  public C()
>  {
>   }
>
>  }

So, as you say: "C is in root.serv.C!". That's exactly what I wrote. The IDE you use has nothing to do with your problem. Try the code I give (this time). It has been tested...
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jurisAuthor Commented:
Yeah, fontaine, your code works, but the one I have written already does not!!!

I mean, I wasn't writing classes A and C, it was a lot of code and it doesn't work although everything is the way that code is.

I don't know what's the problem.

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fontaineCommented:
I know that your problem is more complex. I do with what I have (your example with A, C and N). The idea is to use the code I posted as an example of valid structure. Replace A, C and N by the class names that cause you problems. If you see that they are not located at the same place as in the example, move them. If this is correct, check the "package" and "import" lines. Verify also if they are public or not. Tell me about this.
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ambrosioCommented:
Juris,

check what you have in your JBuilder\myclasses\ folder? If you have moved your source files to different packages not using JBuilder the previously compiled .class files can still be in JBuilder\myclasses folder in wrong places and can confuse the compiler.

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jurisAuthor Commented:
Oh, yeah, Ambrosio, I just moved my classes into multiple packages from one and JBuilder\myclasses\ was full of cached .class files.

Thanks, for your help, everyone.

fountaine, thanks a lot!

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