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HOT SCSI HD - overheating?

Posted on 1998-04-27
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Last Modified: 2013-11-10

I have bought a new CONNER Fast-SCSI-II 4.3G hard drive. It is an obscene metal lump, which fits in one of those 3.5 inch slots, but takes up one and a half times the vertical height as yer average floppy drive.

1. What height name is that?

The hard drive is constantly spinning, and gets very hot while on. It never gets too hot to even touch, but I wouldn't like to ever pick it up at that temperature.

2. Is this a problem?  
3. How hot are hard drives allowed to get?
4. Will this temperature mean that I shouldn't expect this hard drive to last as long as a cooler-running hard drive?
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Question by:mnw21
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by:mnw21
ID: 1134678
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ViperOne earned 50 total points
ID: 1134679
I'll have to get back to you on  number 1

Hot drives are not a problem, as long as you keep it in reasonable limits.
Some parts of a HDD can get up to 80°C (says my HP SureStore manual), so as long as you can still touch it, no worries. It is obvious that the cooler your electronics stay, the longer they'll last, but HP gives 5 years of warranty on both their full-size and their 'normal'-sized drives, so the lifetime is probably longer than you will need it. Don't knwo about Connor, though (warranty, I mean)

If the heat worries you, you can get a HDD-cooling fan (used with drives such as the Cheetah (that 10.000 RPM drive))

Hope this answers your question!

Kind regards,

Simon
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by:mnw21
ID: 1134680

Yes, great.  

So why does my IDE hard drive stay so cool then?

Please do come back on 1. A comment will do.

I'll accept that answer.


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by:ViperOne
ID: 1134681
* If the drive is 1" high (doesn't take up a full slot), then it's a 1/3
height drive.
 * If it takes up 1 bay, or is 1.5" high (same height as a CD-ROM, etc, etc),
then it is a 1/2 height drive.  
* If it takes up 2 bays, or is 3" high, then it is a full-height drive.

There ya go, son
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by:ViperOne
ID: 1134682
Why IDE stays cool? No idea. My 1/3 height HP stays cool all the time, and my half height HP gets rather hot... Who can tell ?

No need to worry, though!

Greetz,

Simon
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