Class derived from Graphics

It is possible to derive a class from the Graphics one ?  

I made this simple applet that draws cross in the screen at mouse click point with double buffering.  To make the cross, I wanted to derive my own class from the Graphics one, and then, create the drawCross function.

In compilation, all fits.  But, when I start the applet under J++, Vstudio returns me this error "Unhandled exception in Object: 0x00000000 : Java Exception" and breaks at the line "tmp2 = (GraphicsEnhanced)tmp;".

What's wrong ?

How can I implement my own Graphics class ?

==========================================
import GraphicsEnhanced;
import java.applet.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class Object extends Applet
{
      //Double buffering
      private Graphics tmp;
      private GraphicsEnhanced tmp2;
      private Image img;
    private Dimension dim = new Dimension();
      //---------------------

      public Object(){
      }

      public void init(){
            dim.height = getSize().height;
        dim.width = getSize().width;
        img = createImage(dim.width, dim.height);
       
            tmp = img.getGraphics();
            tmp2 = (GraphicsEnhanced)tmp;
      }

      public void destroy(){
      }

      public void paint(Graphics g){
            update(g);
      }

      public void update(Graphics g){
            //Double buffering
        g.clearRect(0,0, dim.width, dim.height);
        g.drawImage(img, 0, 0, this);
            //------------------------
      }

      public boolean mouseDown(Event evt, int x, int y){
            tmp.setColor(new Color(0,0,255));
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y-10, x+10,  y+10);    
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y+10, x+10,  y-10);    
            repaint();            
            return true;
      }

      public boolean mouseUp(Event evt, int x, int y){
            tmp.setColor(new Color(255,0,0));
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y-10, x+10,  y+10);    
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y+10, x+10,  y-10);    
            repaint();            
            return true;
      }

      public boolean mouseDrag(Event  evt, int  x, int  y){
            tmp.setColor(new Color(0,0,0));
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y-10, x+10,  y+10);    
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y+10, x+10,  y-10);    
            repaint();            
            return true;
      }

      public void Clear(){
            tmp.clearRect(0,0, dim.width, dim.height);
            repaint();
      }

      public void Trait(int x, int y){
            tmp.setColor(new Color(0,0,0));
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y-10, x+10,  y+10);    
            tmp.drawLine(x-10, y+10, x+10,  y-10);    
            repaint();
      }
}
=========================================
import java.awt.Graphics;

public abstract class GraphicsEnhanced extends Graphics
{
      protected GraphicsEnhanced(){
            //super();
      }
      
      public void drawCross(int x, int y, int width, int thickness){
            int xPoints[] = new int[2];
            int yPoints[] = new int[2];

            xPoints[0] = x - (width / 2);
            xPoints[1] = x + (width / 2);
            yPoints[0] = y - (width / 2);
            yPoints[1] = y + (width / 2);

            fillPolygon(xPoints, yPoints, thickness);
      }

}
LVL 1
mhebertAsked:
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mhebertAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question
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imladrisCommented:
Yes, and no. Yes, the graphics class could be extended. But no, not the hopeful and straightforward fashion you attempted. You (correctly) declared it to be abstract, but you can't use an abstract class. To use and abstract class - like in the line

tmp2 = (GraphicsEnhanced)tmp;

you would have to have a concrete instantiation somewhere, i.e. an extension of GraphicsEnhanced that implemented all of the abstract methods.

The solution I have used, for such a case is an "indirection" class, that takes the Graphics object as an argument.

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imladrisCommented:
For example you could write a class:

class Cross
{  int width,thickness;

  public Cross(int w,int t)
  {  width=w;
     thickness=t;
     return;
  }
   public void draw(Graphics g,int x, int y){
   int xPoints[] = new int[2];
   int yPoints[] = new int[2];

   xPoints[0] = x - (width / 2);
   xPoints[1] = x + (width / 2);
   yPoints[0] = y - (width / 2);
   yPoints[1] = y + (width / 2);

   g.fillPolygon(xPoints, yPoints, thickness);
   }
}


So for this example you would create a Cross object for every "type" of Cross you wanted to use. It could also, of course, simply be done as a static method.

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