replacement for vmunix

I am porting an application from solaris1 to solaris2.  The application has the following command:

nm /vmunix | grep -w _msg | cut -c1-8

how do I obtain this address from solaris2?

Thanks in Advance
Eric
ethornsbAsked:
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jos010697Commented:
Try /kernel/unix instead of /vmunix ...

kind regards,

Jos aka jos@and.nl
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ethornsbAuthor Commented:
In my environment I have no /kernel/unix but instead genunix.  But it does not return the address as solaris1 does.  Here is what solaris1 does

nm /vmunix | grep -w _msg

returns

f01fa758 B _msg

solaris2 does this

nm genunix | grep -w msg

[2875]  |    4|    4|OBJT   |GLOB |0   |COMMON|msg

the address on solaris 1 is what I need?
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jos010697Commented:
This shows that the output format of 'nm' differs on your Solaris2 box ...
first try to find the symbol using 'nm' and 'grep'; if found, pipe it
through 'cut' using the appropriate -c#-# flags ...

kind regards,

Jos aka jos@and.nl
0
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ethornsbAuthor Commented:
Yes, I understand that the output format differs.  That is why I have been unable to obtain the address.  My questions is how do I obtain the address from what the output shows on Solaris2 (in previous comment)?

my unix is not all that great - sorry if you've already said this but I need you to dumb it down a little

the points are yours with a grade A if you can provide anymore assistance.
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seedyCommented:
Use the '-P' option of nm.  This produces a portable output
format.
"nm -P genunix | grep -w msg" gives, in my machine,
     msg        D 00000004 00000004
The output is name, type, value(address) and the size.
So,
     nm -P genunix | grep -w msg | awk '{ print $3 }'
will get you the address of msg symbol.
PS:  Out of curiosity, why do you want to do this?
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jos010697Commented:
or use 'sed' instead of 'cut'. Here's a way to do it:

   nm /vmunix | grep -w _msg | sed -f scriptfile

where 'scriptfile' contains the following little monster:

   s/\[\([0-9A-Za-z]*\)\].*/\1/

Basically, this reads: s/pattern/substitute/

where 'pattern' must match a left square bracket, a bunch of hexadecimal digits
and a right square bracket again. Everything between those square brackets
is pumped to standard output ...

instead of using the 'sed -f scriptfile' syntax, you could type in pass horrible
sed command to sed by putting it on the command line. The trouble is, that
your shell gobbles up all those nasty slashes, brackets etc. ...

kind regards,

Jos aka jos@and.nl

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ethornsbAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the help.  The reason I wanted to do this was because I am trying to port a network communication services pacakge from sol1 and sol2.  When starting the program 2 of the parameters required are the addresses of these two elements.

Thanks Again
Eric
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