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Set registry settings as Admin so that users can access

When an Administrator installs my application I need to install the application's registry settings so that regular users can access the registry settings.

Currently the application's registry settings are in HKEY_CURRENT_USER. When the application is installed by the Administrator the settings are set correctly, BUT when the user logs in (s)/he cannot access the Administrator's HKEY_CURRENT_USER settings.

An alternative solution could be to use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE instead. However 'GetAppRegistryKey()' (in APPUI3.CPP in the MFC src) has HKEY_CURRENT_USER hardcoded in. 'GetAppRegistryKey()' is called by various functions in the MFC library. It is conceivably possible to write our own versions of 'GetAppRegistryKey()' and all the functions that call it, but this could be an ardous task, assuming that all the MFC calls to 'GetAppRegistryKey()' are provided in the source.

I am giving this question 75 points because I am assuming that there is standard (and relatively simple) way of dealing with this problem.
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The GetAppRegistryKey() function is not virtual and there for cannot be overridden by your own function.

The best solution for your problem is to manipulate the registry your self. There is some classes for handling the registry on codeguru:


tconwayAuthor Commented:
This answer specifies wrappers I could use for the registry, but does not explain how I can prevent MFC classes from using HKEY_CURRENT_USER when I want to use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.

For instance, CControlBarInfo::SaveState() calls CWinApp::WriteProfileString() which in turn calls CWinApp::GetAppRegistryKey(). Therefore I cannot use a CDockState object if I want to use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.

I would also be interested in a solution which allows me to put my settings in HKEY_CURRENT_USER as Administrator and also have those settings available to other users.
Ahhh..... OK, now I'm with you. I'll look into the problem.
Here is a suggestion: on setup, write the profile to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. Then, when you run as a user and HKEY_CURRENT_USER does not have the key you expect, copy it from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. This way you have the best of both words. You  can use registry enumeration API so that the registry copying code does not have to know the exat key structure. As an additional benefit, plain users may HAVE to use HKEY_CURRENT_USER  because they do not have writing access to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.
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