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shutting down Win95 - hangs

Posted on 1998-05-02
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I have a new 233MMX system.  It has Win95 version C, I believe this is also known as OSR2.5.   When trying to restart or shutdown it sometimes hangs on the "please wait while your computer shuts down screen".  It doesn't do this all the time so using Microsoft's article #Q145926  doesn't help.  Because it doesn't hang consistently I find troubleshooting impossible, so far.  I've disabled APM.  I am concerned that powering off or resetting the system from this screen will cause other problems.

Other than win95 I have installed Corel WordPerfect Suite 8 and Mcaffee virus scan.  The webscan that came with it has been removed, with no benefit.  The start up folder is empty.
Any help will be appreciated.  If you need more info please ask.

RockyRacoon
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Question by:RockyRacoon
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Expert Comment

by:mitrakis
ID: 1754173
Check out the following article in experts-exchange first (seems to be the same prob):

http://www.experts-exchange.com/topics/comp/os-ms-windows/general/win95/Q.10049269

Regards

-Stavi-


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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1754174
RockyRacoon,
I won't submit this as an answer because you can still get your points back if you delete the question before someone does "answer" it.
From your comment about the startup folder being empty, I gather that you followed step one of the troubleshooting proceedure.
There are many more steps to be taken to root out the cause of your problem.
If you follow closely the proceedures outlined in the K/B article you referenced,(article #Q145926) you'll solve your problem.
Regards,
Ralph

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Expert Comment

by:larbel
ID: 1754175
RockyRacoon,
Just because your startup folder is empty doesn't mean you don't have any apps. running on background.  You can try this and see if you can pin point your problem.  Press Ctrl-Alt-Del to knock off the apps. one at a time and shut down, see if indeed one of the apps. is casuing problem.

BTW, I've looking all over for the Usbupd2.exe file that came with OSR2.5 CD, coz. my PII been casuing lots of problem and according to MS, a core fix for PII is only included with OSR2.5 and that file seem to be it, if it's not too much trouble, can you please email it to me?

Thanks.
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Expert Comment

by:Dr_LC
ID: 1754176
Open up McAfee Vshield Configuration.  Disable "Scan floppies on shut down."

I've seen this happen on many systems and it has happened on mine as well.  Sometimes the system would shut down normally, other times it would hang as you report.
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Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754177
Windows Won't Shutdown?
1st. Look in your system.ini for
[386Enh]
LocalLoadHigh=1
Warning: this may cause unpredictable results if you are not using the
EMM386 memory manager. Remove DoubleSpace/DriveSpace from
memory:
If it is not there add that line, reboot. that should fix it.
See that LocalLoadHigh=1 is or is not in you MSDOS.sys.
If it has a setting of =0 change that to =1

2nd.
To determine if the problem is being caused by a
memory conflict that still exists when Emm386.exe
is not loaded from the Config.sys file, follow these steps:

1.Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit"
(without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.
2.Click the Config.sys window.
3.In the Config.sys file, make sure the following lines exist in this order:
device=c:\windows\himem.sys
device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff
4.Save the Config.sys file, and then exit System Configuration Editor.
5.Restart the computer, then shut down Windows 95
and wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may
be caused by a memory conflict that still exists when
Emm386.exe is not loaded from the Config.sys file.
For information about determining the exact location of the
memory conflict, please see the following article
in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Locating and Excluding RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA
http://premium.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q112/8/16.asp

http://support.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/W95StartUp.asp Article ID: Q145926

This article lists steps to help you troubleshoot problems using the Shut Down command in Windows 95.

MORE INFORMATION

When Windows 95 shuts down it performs many functions, including the transition of all protected-mode drivers back to real mode,
the completion of all disk write functions and flushing of the disk cache, and the closing of all currently running programs, which
includes running the Close Window code for any applications that are running. When Windows 95 does not shut down properly, it
may appear to stop responding (hang) for several minutes, holding at the "Please wait while your computer shuts down" screen.

Shutdown problems in Windows 95 can be caused by an incompatible, damaged, or conflicting device driver, a damaged exit sound
file, or incorrectly configured or damaged hardware. To troubleshoot this problem, perform the following steps:
                                               
                                             Section 1.
1. Determine if the shutdown problem is caused by a program loading from the Startup folder. To do so, follow these steps:

a. Reboot the computer and press the SHIFT key until Windows 95 loads.

b. Click the Start button, and then click Shut Down.

c. Click Shut Down The Computer, and then click Yes. Wait three minutes for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 does not hang, a program being loaded in the Startup folder may be causing the problem.

To determine which program is causing the shutdown problem, remove the icons from the Startup folder one at a time. To do so,
follow these steps:

a. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click Taskbar.

b. Click the Start Menu Programs tab, and then click Advanced.

c. Double-click the Programs folder, and then double-click the Startup folder.

d. Drag any icon from the Startup folder to the Programs folder and then restart the computer.

e. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

f. Repeat steps A-E until the shutdown problem no longer occurs.

Once the program causing the shutdown problem has been identified, contact the program's manufacturer for assistance. If removing
all the icons from the Startup folder does not resolve the problem, continue with these steps.

2. Determine if the shutdown problem is caused by a command line loading automatically from the Win.ini file. To do so, follow these
steps:

a. Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

b. Click the Win.ini window.

c. Locate the "Load=" and "Run=" lines in the Win.ini file. Place a semicolon (;) at the beginning of each line.

d. Save the changes to the Win.ini file and then quit System Configuration Editor.

e. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 does not hang during shutdown, the problem may be caused by a program being loaded from the "Load=" or "Run="
line in the Win.ini file. To determine which program is causing the problem, follow these steps:

a. Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

b. Click the Win.ini window.

c. Create new "Load=" and "Run=" lines in the Win.ini file. Add one command from the original lines.

d. Save the file, and then quit System Configuration Editor.

e. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

f. Repeat steps A-B, add one more command from the original lines, and then repeat steps D-E. Repeat this process until Windows 95
hangs during the shutdown process.

g. Repeat steps A-B, remove the program causing the problem from the "Load=" or "Run=" line, and then repeat steps D-E.

h. After you have identified the program causing the problem, contact the program's manufacturer for assistance. If these steps do not
resolve the problem, continue with step 3.

3. Determine if the problem is being caused by a command being loaded in the Autoexec.bat or Config.sys file. To do so, follow these
steps:

a. Restart Windows 95. When you see the "Starting Windows 95" message, press the F8 key, and then choose Step-By-Step
Confirmation from the Startup menu.

b. Press Y at each of the following prompts. Press N for anyother prompts:

- Load Doublespace driver - Process the system registry - DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS -
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\IFSHLP.SYS - Load the Windows graphical user interface - Load all Windows drivers

c. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by a command line in the Autoexec.bat or Config.sys file. To
determine which line is causing the problem, follow these steps:

a. Restart Windows 95. When you see the "Starting Windows 95" message, press the F8 key, and then choose Step-By-Step
Confirmation from the Startup menu.

b. Press Y for each of the following prompts, plus one additional command. Press N for all other prompts:

- Load Doublespace driver - Process the system registry - DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS -
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\IFSHLP.SYS - Load the Windows graphical user interface - Load all Windows drivers

c. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

d. Repeat steps A-C until the problem occurs.

When the problem occurs, you have identified the command causing the problem. Edit the file containing the command and disable the
command. If these steps do not resolve the problem, continue with step 4.

4. Determine if the problem is being caused by a memory conflict that still exists when Emm386.exe is not loaded from the Config.sys
file. To do so, follow these steps:

a. Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK.

b. Click the Config.sys window.

c. In the Config.sys file, make sure the following lines exist in this order:

device=c:\windows\himem.sys device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff

d. Save the Config.sys file, and then quit System Configuration Editor.

e. Restart the computer.

f. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by a memory conflict that still exists when Emm386.exe is not
loaded from the Config.sys file. For information about determining the exact location of the memory conflict, please see the following
article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

ARTICLE-ID: Q112816 TITLE:
Locating and Excluding RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA

If these steps do not resolve the problem, continue with step 5.

5. Determine if the problem is being caused by a virtual device driver being loaded from the System.ini file. To do so, follow
thesesteps:

a. Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the System.ini
window.

b. Locate the [386Enh] section of the file.

c. In the [386Enh] section, place a semicolon (;) at the beginning of each line that begins with "Device=" and ends with ".386".

d. Save the System.ini file, and then quit System Configuration Editor.

e. Restart Windows 95.

f. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 does not hang during the shutdown process, the problem may be caused by a virtual device driver being loaded in the
System.ini file. To determine which driver is causing the problem, follow these steps:

a. Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click OK. Click the System.ini
window.

b. Locate the [386Enh] section of the file.

c. Remove one of the semicolons that you added in step C above.

d. Save the System.ini file, and then quit System Configuration Editor.

e. Restart Windows 95.

f. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

g. Repeat steps A-F until the problem reoccurs.

When the problem reoccurs, you have identified the virtual device driver causing the problem. Contact the driver's manufacturer for
assistance. If these steps do not resolve the problem, continue with step 6.

6. Determine if the shutdown problem is being caused by a damaged exit sound file. To do so, follow these steps:

a. In Control Panel, double-click Sounds.

b. In the Events box, click Exit Windows.

c. In the Name box, click None.

d. Click OK.

e. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 does not hang during the shut down process, the problem may be caused by a damaged exit sound file. Restore the
sound file from a backup, or reinstall the program that provided the sound file. If these steps do not resolve the problem, continue with
step 7.

7. Determine if Advanced Power Management (APM) is causing the shutdown problem. To do so, disable it by following these steps.
                              Disableing APM [Advanced Power Management]
Your problem Most likely is APM (Advanced Power Management).
1. Enter BIOS Setup, go to Power Management and disable it.
2. Enter Device Manager, expand last element of tree (System devices),
go to APM section, select it and click properties,
check 'disable APM polling' checkbox.
 

NOTE: Not all computers have APM features. If your computer does not have APM features, skip to step 8.

a. In Control Panel, double-click System, and then click the Device Manager tab.

b. Double-click the System Devices branch to expand it.

c. Double-click Advanced Power Management in the device list, click the Settings tab, and then click the Enable Power Management
check box to clear it.

d. Click OK until you return to Control Panel.

e. Restart Windows 95.

f. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by APM. Contact the computer's manufacturer for assistance. If
these steps do not resolve the problem, continue with step 8.

8. Determine if the shutdown problem is caused by the Windows 95 file system settings. To do so, follow these steps:

a. In Control Panel, double-click System, and then click the Performance tab.

b. Click File System, and then click the Troubleshooting tab.

c. Click all the check boxes to select them.

d. Click OK, click Close, and then click Yes.

e. Restart Windows 95.

f. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem is related to the File System settings. If these steps do not resolve the problem,
continue with step 9.

9. Determine if a Windows 95 device driver is causing the shutdown problem, or if a device installed in your computer is configured
incorrectly or is not functioning properly. To do so, follow these steps:

a. In Control Panel, double-click System, and then click the Hardware Profiles tab.

b. Click the hardware profile that you are currently using, and then click Copy.

c. Type "Test Configuration" in the To box, and then click OK.

d. Click the Device Manager tab.

e. Double-click any device, and then click the Test Configuration check box to clear it. Repeat this step until you have disabled all
devices. Do not disable any system devices.

f. When you are prompted to restart Windows 95, click No.

NOTE: If you disable a PCI hard disk controller, choose Yes to restart Windows 95. PCI hard disk controllers cannot be unloaded
dynamically.

g. Restart Windows 95. When Windows 95 restarts, you receive the following message:

Windows cannot determine what configuration your computer is in. Select one of the following:

Choose Test Configuration from the list of configurations. As Windows 95 starts, you receive the following error message:

Your Display Adapter is disabled. To correct the problem, click OK to open Device Manager.

Click Cancel. When the Display Properties dialog box opens, click Cancel.

h. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by a Windows 95 device driver or a device installed in your
computer that is configured incorrectly or is not functioning properly. To determine which device driver or device is causing the
problem, follow these steps:

a. In Control Panel, double-click System, and then click the Device Manager tab.

b. Double-click a device that you disabled in step E above, and then click the Test Configuration check box to select it.

c. When you are prompted to restart Windows 95, click Yes.

d. Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

e. Repeat steps A-D until the problem reoccurs. When the problem reoccurs, you have identified the device or device driver causing
the problem.

NOTE: If the shutdown problem is being caused by a Plug and Play device that is configured incorrectly or is not functioning properly,
removing the device from the current hardware profile will correct the problem. After you remove the device from the current
hardware profile and restart Windows 95, the drivers associated with the device are removed from memory and the shutdown problem
does not occur. However, as Windows 95 starts, the Plug and Play device will be detected automatically and installed in the current
hardware profile. When you restart Windows 95 a second time, the drivers associated with the device are again loaded in memory and
the shutdown problem returns.

If no luck on any of this, some you've already read. We have other tricks,
Bud
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754178
Or try the Rule Out Bad PnP Bios; setup /p i [approach]
If Windows 95 continues to hang on shutdown after you complete steps A-H, reinstall Windows 95 to a different folder to rule out
the possibility of damaged files. For example, if Windows 95 is currently installed in the Windows folder, install it to a Win95 folder. If
your computer has a Plug and Play BIOS, reinstall Windows 95 using the "setup /P I" command to rule out a defective Plug and Play
BIOS.

If Windows 95 still hangs during the shutdown process after you reinstall it, your computer may have faulty hardware or faulty
system components including RAM, the CPU, the motherboard, or an internal or external cache. Contact your computer's
manufacturer for assistance.

10. View the Bootlog.txt file to pinpoint the problem.

If Windows 95 still hangs during the shutdown process, examine the Bootlog.txt file for "Terminate=" entries. These entries are located
at the end of the file and may provide clues as to the cause of the problem.

Each "Terminate=" entry should have a matching "EndTerminate=" entry on a successful shutdown. If the last line in the Bootlog.txt
file is "EndTerminate=KERNEL," Windows 95 shut down successfully. If the last line in the Bootlog.txt file is one of the following
entries, check the listed possible cause:

Last line                  Possible cause
Terminate=Query Drivers Possible QEMM or other memory manager issue.

Terminate=Unload Network Possible conflict with real-mode network driver in the Config.sys file.

Terminate=Reset Display Disable video shadowing. You may also need an updated video driver.

Terminate=RIT Possible timer-related problems with the sound card or an old mouse driver.

Terminate=Win32 Problem with a 32-bit program blocking a thread. Possibly Microsoft Visual C for Windows.

11. If the previous steps in this article do not resolve the problem, try resetting the computer's CMOS settings back to the factory
defaults. For information about changing CMOS settings in your computer, please consult the computer's documentation or
manufacturer.

WARNING: Before you reset the computer's CMOS settings back to the factory defaults, make sure to write down the CMOS
settings.

NOTE: The PC Speaker driver (Speaker.drv) can cause Windows 95 to stop responding at shutdown or startup. To disable the PC
Speaker driver, disable the "wave=speaker.drv" line in the System.ini file. To disable this line, place a semicolon (;) at the beginning of
the line. After you make this change, restart your computer.

                                             Section 2.
Is there a memory conflict in the upper memory area?
To determine if the problem is being caused by a memory conflict that still exists when Emm386.exe is not loaded from the Config.sys
file, follow these steps: 1.Click the Start button, click Run, type "sysedit" (without quotation marks) in the Open box, and then click
OK. 2.Click the Config.sys window. 3.In the Config.sys file, make sure the following lines exist in this order:
device=c:\windows\himem.sys device=c:\windows\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff 4.Save the Config.sys file, and then exit System
Configuration Editor. 5.Restart the computer, then shut down Windows 95 and wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by a memory conflict that still exists when Emm386.exe is not
loaded from the Config.sys file. For information about determining the exact location of the memory conflict, please see the following
article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: Locating and Excluding RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA (Q112816)

                                             Section 3.
Are the entries in the Windows .ini files correct?
To determine whether the System.ini or Win.ini file is causing a problem, try the following steps: 1.Rename the System.ini file in the
Windows folder to System.sav. 2.Copy (do not rename) the System.cb file in the Windows folder to System.ini. 3.Add the following
line to the [boot] section of the System.ini file and then save the file: drivers=mmsystem.dll 4.Rename the Win.ini file in the Windows
folder to Win.sav. 5.Restart your computer.

If this works, there is a problem with an entry in the System.ini or Win.ini file. Examine these files more closely to determine the exact
cause of the problem.

                                                 
                                             Section 4.
Is the Advanced Power Management feature on your computer causing the shutdown problem?
To determine if Advanced Power Management (APM) is causing the shutdown problem, disable it by following these steps. Note: Not
all computers have APM features. If your computer does not have APM features, continue with the troubleshooter. 1.In Control Panel,
double-click System, and then click the Device Manager tab. 2.Double-click the System Devices branch to expand it. 3.Double-click
Advanced Power Management in the device list, click the Settings tab, and then click the Enable Power Management check box to
clear it. 4.Click OK until you return to Control Panel. 5.Restart Windows 95. 6.Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut
down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be caused by APM. Contact the computer's manufacturer for assistance.

                                                 
                                             Section 5.
Is the problem in the Windows 95 file system settings?
To determine if the shutdown problem is caused by the Windows 95 file system settings, follow these steps: 1.In Control Panel,
double-click System, and then click the Performance tab. 2.Click File System, and then click the Troubleshooting tab. 3.Click all the
check boxes to select them. 4.Click OK, click Close, and then click Yes. 5.Restart Windows 95. 6.Shut down Windows 95. Wait for
Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 shuts down properly, the problem may be related to the file system settings. To better determine which file system
setting is causing the problem, follow the steps above but clear the check box for one option. If Windows 95 shuts down properly,
repeat the steps again and clear the check box for another option. Repeat this process until you determine which file system setting is
causing the problem. For more information about the file system Troubleshooting tab, please see the following article in the Microsoft
Knowledge Base: Description of the File System Troubleshooting Settings (Q165503)

Description of the File System Troubleshooting Options

Last reviewed: March 20, 1997 Article ID: Q165503 The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Windows 95

SUMMARY

The System tool in Control Panel contains a set of options for changing file system performance settings. You can use these options
when you experience hardware or software compatibility problems. NOTE: Enabling any of the file system troubleshooting options
may seriously degrade system performance.

MORE INFORMATION

To display the file system troubleshooting options, follow these steps:

1.In Control Panel, double-click System.

2.Click the Performance tab.

3.Click File System.

4.Click the Troubleshooting tab.

The following table describes the settings on the Troubleshooting tab:

File system option    Description

Disable New File Sharing And Locking Semantics This option alters the internal rules for file sharing and locking on hard disks,
governing whether certain processes can have access to open files in certain share modes that guarantee a file will not be modified.
This option should be checked only in the rare case that an MS-DOS-based application has problems sharing under Windows 95. This
sets SoftCompatMode=0 in the registry.

Disable Long Name Preservation For Old Programs This option turns off the tunneling feature, which preserves long filenames when
files are opened and saved by applications that do not recognize long filenames. This option should be checked in the rare case that an
important legacy application is not compatible with long filenames. This sets PreserveLongNames=0 in the registry.

Disable Protected-Mode Hard Disk Interrupt Handling This option prevents Windows 95 from terminating interrupts from the hard disk
controller and bypassing the ROM routine that handles these interrupts. Some hard disk drives might require this option to be checked
in order for interrupts to be processed correctly. If this option is checked, the ROM routine handles the interrupts, which slows
system performance. This sets VirtualHDIRQ=1 in the registry. (This setting is off by default for all computers in Windows 95, which
is the reverse of Windows 3.x.)

Disable All 32-Bit, Protected-Mode Disk Drivers This option ensures that no 32-bit disk drivers are loaded in the system, except the
floppy driver. Typically, you would check this option if the computer does not start due to disk peripheral I/O problems. If this option
is enabled, all I/O will go through real-mode drivers or the BIOS. Notice that in this case, all disk drives that are visible only in
protected mode will no longer be visible. This sets ForceRMIO=1 in the registry.

Disable Write-Behind Caching For All Drives This option ensures that all data is flushed continually to the hard disk, removing any
performance benefits gained from disk caching. This option should be checked only in the rare cases where you are performing risky
operations and must ensure prevention of data loss. For example, a software developer who is debugging data at Ring 0 while creating
a virtual device driver would check this option. This sets DriveWriteBehind=0 in the registry.

Each option sets a value in the following registry key: Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\FileSystem

                                                 
                                             Section 6.
Is the problem listed in the Bootlog.txt file?
View the Bootlog.txt file to pinpoint the problem. If Windows 95 still hangs during the shutdown process, examine the Bootlog.txt file
for "Terminate=" entries. These entries are located at the end of the file and may provide clues as to the cause of the problem. Each
"Terminate=" entry should have a matching "EndTerminate=" entry on a successful shutdown. If the last line in the Bootlog.txt file is
"EndTerminate=KERNEL," Windows 95 shut down successfully. If the last line in the Bootlog.txt file is one of the following entries,
check the listed possible cause: Last line Possible cause Terminate=Query Drivers Possible memory manager issue (such as QEMM).
Terminate=Unload Network Possible conflict with real-mode network driver in the Config.sys file. Terminate=Reset Display Disable
video shadowing. You may also need an updated video driver. Terminate=RIT Possible timer-related problems with the sound card or
an old mouse driver. Terminate=Win32 Problem with a 32-bit program blocking a thread. Possibly Microsoft Visual C for Windows.

                                                 
                                             Section 7.
Is the exit sound file causing problems with shutdown?
To determine if the shutdown problem is being caused by a damaged exit sound file, follow these steps: 1.In Control Panel,
double-click Sounds.
2.In the Events box, click Exit Windows.
3.In the Name box, click None.
4.Click OK.
5.Shut down Windows 95. Wait for Windows 95 to shut down.

If Windows 95 does not hang during the shutdown process, the problem may be caused by a damaged exit sound file. Restore the
sound file from a backup, or reinstall the program that provided the sound file.
                                               
                             Locating RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA [MSD]
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q112/8/16.asp
Locating and Excluding RAM/ROM Addresses in the UMA

This article describes how to locate adapter RAM and ROM addresses
in the upper memory area (UMA) by using the Microsoft Diagnostic
(MSD) utility and/or excluding memory ranges on the EMM386.EXE line
in the CONFIG.SYS file.

The UMA, which is between 640K and 1024K, is primarily reserved for
RAM and ROM on hardware devices. The UMA is also used by EMM386.EXE
to load device drivers and terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR)
programs into available addresses in the UMA. Conflicts can result
when either of the following occur:

* Two or more hardware devices are trying to use the same memory
address in the UMA.

-or-
* EMM386.EXE is unable to detect whether an address is in use by
a hardware device and loads a TSR program or device driver
into that address.

To determine which of the above is causing the problem, edit your
EMM386.EXE line in the CONFIG.SYS file to read as follows:

device=c:\dos\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff

Reboot the computer. If the problem still occurs, it may be caused
by multiple hardware devices using the same memory address. In such
cases, you must consult your hardware documentation or manufacturer
for information on resolving the conflict.

If the problem does not occur, it is most likely being caused by a
conflict with EMM386.EXE and a hardware device in the UMA. To
resolve this type of conflict, you must identify which upper memory
addresses are being used by hardware and then exclude these
addresses using the EMM386.EXE device line in the CONFIG.SYS file.
The Microsoft Diagnostic (MSD) utility can be used to identify
upper memory blocks (UMBs) in use by hardware. To do this:

1. Reboot the computer and perform a "clean boot" by pressing F5
once when the message "Starting MS-DOS..." appears.

2. Type "msd" (without the quotation marks) at the MS-DOS command
prompt, and press M to select Memory. Using the legend at the
top of the screen, locate the area(s) marked as RAM and/or
ROM, and make a note of the starting and ending addresses of
this area(s). This is the area(s) that needs to be excluded
using the EMM386.EXE device line in the CONFIG.SYS file.

3. Open the CONFIG.SYS file and add the exclusion(s) to the
EMM386.EXE line (for example, X=C000-C7FF X=D800-DBFF), and
restart the computer.

If memory conflicts exist after you complete the above procedure,
there may be some adapter RAM and/or ROM addresses that MSD is
unable to correctly detect. Use the following technique to help
isolate the conflicting memory region.

1. Verify that the problem is being caused by a conflict in the
UMA by editing the CONFIG.SYS file and specifying the
following parameters on the EMM386.EXE device line:

a. NOEMS b. X=A000-F7FF c. Remove any other X= or I=
parameters d. Remove the HIGHSCAN parameter, if present

A sample line might read as follows:

device=c:\dos\emm386.exe noems x=a000-f7ff

2. Save the changes and restart the computer. If the problem goes
away, continue with the steps below. If the problem still
occurs, it is not being caused by a conflict in the UMA, and
you need to perform other troubleshooting to determine the
cause of the problem. For more information on troubleshooting
EMM386.EXE, query on the following words in the Microsoft
Knowledge Base:

emm386.exe and troubleshooting and notr

3. If the problem is corrected by using X=A000-F7FF, edit the
CONFIG.SYS file and shrink the excluded range by changing the
parameter to X=C000-F7FF. Save the file and restart the
computer. If the problem does not recur, proceed to the next
step.

If the problem does recur, the conflict may be in either the
A000 or B000 range. To verify this, change the X=C000-F7FF
parameter to X=A000-BFFF and restart the computer. If this
corrects the problem, you can further narrow the range by
changing the parameter to X=A000-AFFF. If the problem still
exists, try X=B000-BFFF. Once you have narrowed the problem
down to a specific range (B000-BFFF), you may be able to
narrow it down to half of the range. To do this, try excluding
either the first half (X=B000-B7FF) or the second half
(X=B800-BFFF) of the range. If neither of these work, you must
leave the whole range excluded (X=B000-BFFF).

4. If specifying X=C000-F7FF does not cause the problem to recur,
open the CONFIG.SYS file and shrink the range further to
X=D000-F7FF. Restart the computer and see if the problem
recurs. If not, shrink the range further to X=E000-F7FF.
Repeat this process until the problem recurs.

5. When the problem recurs, edit the CONFIG.SYS file to change
the first number in the range back to what it had been and
decrease the second number in the range. For example, if
X=D000-F7FF worked correctly, but X=E000-F7FF did not, change
the first number back to D000 and decrease the second number,
so the range reads X=D000-EFFF. If that works, decrease the
second number again (X=D000-DFFF). Once you have narrowed the
problem down to a specific range (for example, D000-DFFF), you
may be able to narrow it down to half of the range. To do
this, try excluding either the first half (X=D000-D7FF) or the
second half (X=D800-DFFF). If neither of these work, you must
leave the whole range excluded (X=D000-DFFF).

Notes

* If you have several hardware devices in your system using
upper memory addresses, you may need to exclude more than one
range. For example, you might list X=C000-C7FF X=E000-EFFF on
the EMM386.EXE line.
* If may be possible to narrow an exclusion to a smaller portion
of a range (for example, X=C000-C3FF or X=C400-C7FF or
X=C800-CBFF or X=CC00-CFFF.)

The MSD utility contains a memory map that may be helpful in
understanding how the upper memory ranges are divided and defined.
To view the memory map, type "msd" (without the quotation marks) at
an MS-DOS command prompt and then choose M for Memory.

                             Starting or Shutting Down Win95 "Winstart.bat"
Is there a Winstart.bat file loading TSRs for your older Windows-based
programs?

A Winstart.bat file may be located in your Windows folder. If it exists, rename it to
Winstart.old. If this resolves the problem, one of the files being loaded by the
Winstart.bat file is causing the problem. Contact the manufacturer of the program
that is causing the problem for information about using it with Windows 95.

                                    SHUTDOWN AND AUTOSCAN
OSR2 includes versions of the Io.sys and Win.com files that check the
Clean Shutdown and Hard Disk Error bits in the Virtual File Allocation
Table (VFAT) during startup. If either of these bits is turned on
(that is, cleared to 0) on any drive present in real mode, you are
prompted to run ScanDisk.

The Clean Shutdown and Hard Disk Error bits are the two low-order bits
of the FAT entry for cluster 1. If bit 0 is 0, it indicates an unclean
shutdown; if bit 1 is 0, it indicates that a hard disk error occurred
on that drive. These bits are turned on by VFAT; they are turned off
only by ScanDisk. The Clean Shutdown bit is turned off upon completion
of a standard run. The Hard Disk Error bit is turned off upon
completion of a surface scan (regardless of whether errors were
repaired). "

Based on the above, I think you could try the following:

1. Replace your current scandisk files - they may be defective, and
therefore not turning off the appropriate "bit"

2. Simply turn off Scandisk running at startup. To do this, change the
setting AUTOSCAN=1 to AUTOSCAN=0 in your msdos.sys file.
For info on editing msdos.sys, see
"Contents of the Windows 95 Msdos.sys File"
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q118/5/79.asp
At the bottom of the page you'll find instructions on how to edit the
settings.

3. Replace your current io.sys and win.com files, since they are also
involved in the process. (Make backups of your current ones first, to
be be safe - these are critical system files).

Bud
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1754179
Bud,
All of that is in the article that RockyRacoon and I have already referred to.  I already said that if he used it, he would solve his problem.
(And, I even tried to save his points!)
Ralph

0
 

Author Comment

by:RockyRacoon
ID: 1754180
To everyone who has responded,

Thanks very much for such speedy replies.  It is greatly appreciated.  I will try them in the order that I received them.  The first one to solve the problem will get the points.  I suppose it is a bit of a crap shoot in that anyone of the answers could be right, it just depends on what is the specific problem with my pc.  

RockyRacoon
0
 

Expert Comment

by:hankc
ID: 1754181
RR, I had the same problem with win98. I won't write a long cure but I will say I just reloaded the system over itself and it cured the problem.
Hank
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754182
Ralph, it was a comment, notice I didn't mark it answered.

Rocky, go to
http://support.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/tshooterlist.asp?PR=w95
Windows 95: Solving Problems Starting or Shutting Down Windows 95

It's a very good trouble shooting wizzard.

Regards,
Bud
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754183
One more question Rocky,
Are you on a network??

If so, see
http://search.dejanews.com/query_profile.xp?query=OSR2.5+shutdown+hangs&nofilt=1

Look at it even if you not on a net work. Many ideas.
it seems OSR2.5 has it's own little problems like every other os.

Bud
0
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Author Comment

by:RockyRacoon
ID: 1754184
Hi to all who have responded to my question.  Unfortunately, or fortunately, depending on your view point, my problem has stopped.  This, of course, makes troubleshooting impossible.  But I would like to award points even though I do not know  which answer is the problem solver.  There is a lot of good info that has been sent my way.  Thanks to all.  I would like to distribute the 150 points offered on this question as follows:
smeebud: 60
rmarotta: 40
larbel: 20
mitrakis: 20
Dr_LC: 10

To larbel:  I have searched my hard drive for usbupd.exe and can't find it.  Could it been on the CD in a .cab file and not have been installed?

Does Experts Exchange monitor these comments or do I have to click on a Grade for points to be awarded?

Thanks again to all, alot of great info.  It is much appreciated.

RockyRacoon
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:larbel
ID: 1754185
RockyRacoon,
Maybe I'm wrong about the file name, coz. MS only mentioned 1 core update file for PII.  Thanks anyway :>
Larbel
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754186
Rocky,
write linda@experts-exchange.com
Refere her to http://www.experts-exchange.com/Q.10050790
I don't know how she will handle this. Don't grade until she respondes.

Tell me please. What fixed your problem??

Regards
Bud
0
 

Author Comment

by:RockyRacoon
ID: 1754187
Bud ,

I will email Linda right away.  I propose to award points as listed in my earlier comment because I don't know what fixed the problem.  I have been away for a few days and not had a chance to go throught the info everyone presented.  Your's especially, was most  detailed and would require some time.  That's ok, of course, but in the mean time the pc refuses to hang.  Thus, if I make changes according to your suggestions or others, I won't know  if the problem is solved, because it is not there right now.  It's sounds strange, but that's what has happened.

Rocky Racoon
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754188
Right now, If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it.

Bud
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:linda101698
ID: 1754189

You can only grade one proposed answer.  Since you would like to give
smeebud the most points, this is how I propose we handle the problem.

Reject the current answer by requesting another expert.  You do this by
choosing the option Reopen question to other experts. Ask smeebud to
post an answer so you can award him the points at the current question.
I added 150 points to your account which you can use to split between
the other experts.

You can do this by posting new questions for each of them.  In the
question title put:
Question for (expert's login)

Then in the question put:
This question is posted to award you points for your help on question:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Q.10050790

Linda Gardner
Customer Service @ Experts Exchange
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:rosscoe
ID: 1754190
Boot the machine is safe mode. If shutting down from safe mode is fast, then you have a driver problem.

If you're networked, remove the network card from device manager. If that sppeds up shut down, then you have a problem with network card drivers.

Set sounds in control panel to none. If that speeds it up, you have a problem with sound card drivers.


0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1754191
Rocky,
Please do as Linda suggested.
Reject rosscoe's answer and we'll post an answer you can grade.

Bud
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:theyak
ID: 1754192
Next time it hangs Rocky, just move your swap file to another dirve (via windows settings) or delete the current swap file
and reboot.

0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:linda101698
ID: 1754193
smeebud,
Post an answer so the question can be graded.   RockyRacoon emailed me that he's having trouble accessing the internet but if you post an answer I'll grade the question if  RockyRacoon still cannot gain access.

Linda
0
 
LVL 14

Accepted Solution

by:
smeebud earned 150 total points
ID: 1754194
    Rocky, go to
      http://support.microsoft.com/support/tshoot/tshooterlist.asp?PR=w95
      Windows 95: Solving Problems Starting or Shutting Down Windows 95

      It's a very good trouble shooting wizzard.

      Regards,
      Bud


0
 

Author Comment

by:RockyRacoon
ID: 1754195
Thanks Bud,

Sorry for the delay in grading, I thought I had taken care of it a few weeks ago.

RockyRacoon
0

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