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Why -newer option doesn't work in find command?

Posted on 1998-05-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
I tried to find all the files which were created after a file /tmp/aaa, but it doesn't seem to give me the right answer. Here's what I did ( IRIX6.2):
1. ls -l /tmp/aaa
-rw-r--r--    1 root     sys            7 May 18 07:00 /tmp/aaa
2. stat /tmp/aaa
/tmp/aaa:
        inode 2099346; dev 33554704; links 1; size 7
        regular; mode is rw-r--r--; uid 0 (root); gid 0 (sys)
        st_fstype: xfs
        change time - Tue May 26 11:29:39 1998 <896200179>
        access time - Mon May 18 07:00:00 1998 <895492800>
        modify time - Mon May 18 07:00:00 1998 <895492800>

3. find / -local -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -l {} \;
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     sys            9 Feb 20  1997 CDROM
lrwxr-xr-x    1 root     sys            4 Feb 20  1997 debug -> proc
drwxr-xr-x   18 root     sys        12288 May 14 15:28 dev
drwxr-xr-x   19 root     sys        12288 May 18 15:20 etc
dr-xr-xr-x    1 root     sys          512 May 14 15:24 home
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     bin           43 May  8 08:10 krb5
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     sys           72 Nov 11  1997 lib
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     sys           39 Nov 11  1997 lib32
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     sys           21 Aug 25  1997 lib64
drwxr-xr-x    2 root     sys            9 Jan 29 06:28 mnt


Look at those dates! Those I expected should be later than May 18, right?
Please explain to me. Thanks.
Emay
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Question by:Emay
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Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 2007242
perhaps / itself is newer than /tmp/aaa?
try
 find / -local -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -ld {} \;
or
 find / -local \! -type d -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -ld {} \;

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Author Comment

by:Emay
ID: 2007243
It worked! Thanks a lot!!
But I am not quit get it though. How come ls -ld worked but ls -l did not?
Thank you very much
Emay
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 2007244
You could use something like
 find / -local \! -type d -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -l {} \;
(but then you don't get to see if / is newer than /tmp/aaa)
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Author Comment

by:Emay
ID: 2007245
Thank you very much for your help
Emay
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Accepted Solution

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ozo earned 50 total points
ID: 2007246
find / -local -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -ld {} \;
find / -local \! -type d -newer /tmp/aaa -exec ls -l {} \;
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 2007247
Emay, was there anything else you needed?
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