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Lost #include file.

Posted on 1998-06-02
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Last Modified: 2013-11-18
I'm writing a listing that "#includes" a <vector.h> file.
However, I keep getting the error message..." cannot open <vector.h>". I've tried to compile in Borland Turbo C++ and Visual C++, and get the same message in both. Would greatly appreciate some timely assistance.
Thanks in advance!
               Frank
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Question by:FrankD
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Expert Comment

by:jstolan
ID: 1165117
First make sure you have vector.h on your computer.  This is not part of the normal visual c++ include files.  If you do, make sure that it resides on the proper search path for the compiler.  In visual C++ this is found under the tools-options menu item on the directories tab.  If you don't want to move the file or add to the #include directory search list, you can copy the file to the source directory of your program, and change the line to be:

#include "vector.h"
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Expert Comment

by:jperret
ID: 1165118
My version of VC++ is 5.0. And no, I can't find any vector.h file on my computer. I guess my problem is that I need to find out how to obtain or create that type of file.
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Author Comment

by:FrankD
ID: 1165119
The file is <vector> not <ventor.h>.
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nietod earned 50 total points
ID: 1165120
Opps jperret had that one before me.
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