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Which Memory to Buy

I'm just about to spring for 128MB of SDRAM.  It will be run on a BX MB with a PI 266.  

I plan to get PC100 compliant, but then there are two kinds. My question is, should I spend extra to get
the ECC SDRAM, or not.  Also, what's the EEPROM in SDRAM for?  One more thing, is there anything
special about Corsair brand that makes it so expensive?  

My confusion comes from the fact that I can find one brand of 128MB SDRAM DIMMs runnning for$300 and another as low as $139 with no apparent difference in specs.  What is the difference?  
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Bigpaws
Asked:
Bigpaws
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BigpawsAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question
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BigpawsAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question
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OttaCommented:
> should I spend extra to get the ECC SDRAM, or not.

ECC adds "error-correction" when errors
occur while writing to or reading from RAM.

So, if you ever do hit an "error",
ECC will catch it, and your PC will continue to run.
In some "mission-critical" application,
this could be invaluable.
On a "home-computer", do you need it?

> Also, what's the EEPROM in SDRAM for?

PROM == Programmable Read-Only Memory,
i.e., memory which _CAN_ be rewritten,
by special procedures, but, in all other
circumstances, behaves as "read-only" memory.

For example, the BIOS programming in your PC
is "read-only", but may be "flash-upgradable".
Similarly, the software in a K56Flex or X2 or V.90 modem is "read-only", but upgradable.
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larbelCommented:
There're PC100 compliant SDRam, and there're PC100 *claim* SDRam, the real PC100 compliant SD are with better mapped PCB, and EEPROM and SPD is a must.  The spec. sheet for PC100 in compares to PC66 is like 10 times of the size.  There's lot of well make PC66 SD that is capable of running at 100, 112 or even 133, it's not so much depends on -ns, instead it's how good is the PCB...

EEPROM stands for Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory, as suggested, an EEPROM is the type of ROM that can be erased.  And it's memory can be preserved even when there's no power.  The drawback is, EEPROM can be written or erased only one byte at a time.

ECC stands for Error Correction Control if I remembering it right...  It will allow error control to some extend, (4kbyte I think) but it will actually slow things down... (Not anything that noticable however), it's usually a lot more expensive than without it.  Personally, I just don't think it's worth it.  Oh, if you're to get a PII 266, most of it will not have ECC L2 cache where PII 300 upward, the L2 cache is ECC.

If you're not planning to overclock it to 133MHz FSB, a $139 128 module is more than enough, as long as it has SPD and EEPROM.

Oops...  Otta just beat me to the answer..... :<
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