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partitioning a HDD

Posted on 1998-06-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I have a PC with a 1.2 GB HDD as one partition C: with a compressed drive H:.   I have just added a 4.2 GB HDD which I want to partition as 8 x 500 MB partitions.
Using fdisk I can set partitions for D:, E:, F:, G:, but the next one overlays H: on my original disk.   Can you tell me how I can avoid this problem.

Thanks in advance John
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Question by:jcolles
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by:larbel
ID: 1756374
Can you explain more?  Are you able to boot into Windows?  It should be corrected once you're in window...  Where exactly does the overlays ocurrs?
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apawelski earned 200 total points
ID: 1756375
If you are using Win95 drivespace3 you can specify the drive letter that you want the compressed volume to be on.  Just select that to be a lower letter - like P

Start|Programs|Accessories|System Tools|Drivespace

Can I ask a question - Why are you breaking a 4Gb drive up into lots of little chunks?


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by:jrbuck
ID: 1756376
why bother with so many partitions?  Are you using win95 OEM service release 2?  it enables large disk support, (FAT32).  Is the reason for so many drives to keep the cluster size down? the maximum partition size for fat16 is around 2GB.  Also if you plan to go to Windows 98, you can convert any FAT16 partitions to FAT32, which gives you 4k blocks.  So for now you could have larger partitons, which solves your problem.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756377
jcolles,
It will be helpful to know more about your system to better advise you on solving the problem.
What CPU and type of HD interface? (IDE or EIDE, SCSI) CDROM type?
Windows95 version number?  Type of compression used currently?
Regards,
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756378
Thank you all for your comments.
Yes the reason for small partitions is that a 512MB patition keeps the cluster size to 8KB.   I have a 100MHz Pentium with EIDE HDD, windows v 4.00.095a and am using drivespace for disk H:
I am interested that OEM service release 2 allows 32 bit FATS I thought this was waiting for W98 and I am not sure whether there may be prolonged delays before this is released. If the sevice release is added, will existing files be converted and use less disk space ?   I assume the release is available on the NET ?
I realise that I can change the compressed drive letter, but presumably this will not resore all the links that have been made to software already in the old drive h:.
Finally the overlay occurrs when I use fdisk to make the next partition.  It choses H: and hence overlays the compressed drive on my old HDD.

Regards John
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756379
John,
If the proposed answer has not solved your problem, simply reopen the question so that other experts may provide you with a solution.
Don't worry about restoring links to your old host drive as there aren't any.  (Drive H: is hidden)
Why not copy the data from your compressed drive to the new hard drive?  Then fdisk & re-format the old drive.
FAT16 will access up to 2GB of drive size.  If cluster size bothers you, there is an undocumented switch used with FDISK to change it to whatever size you like.

Next, you won't find OSR2 on the net.  It is only supposed to be available with a new system or hard drive purchase.
If you do obtain it, then you can install Win95B (OSR2) using FAT32, which can access your entire hard drive as one partition with a cluster size of 4k.
Be aware though, OSR2 is not an upgrade.
FAT32 must be installed on a clean hard drive that has been FDISKed for large disk support.
Prior versions of Windows or Dos cannot access the data written on a FAT32 drive.
Win98 can use FAT32, and will upgrade over your installation of Win95.
Regards,
Ralph

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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756380
John,
Any comment?  Have you solved your problem yet?
Ralph

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by:jcolles
ID: 1756381
rmarotta.
I have come to the conclusion that there is not really an answer.   Putting this disk on is going to be a major disruption and I am looking at several possibilities.   Incidentally H: is not hidden.   H: is a compressed drive which occupies approximately half of the C: drive, so both are available  as useable disks
John
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756382
John,
Drive H: is normally the host for a compressed drive.  It contains system files and a single large file, which is the compressed drive.
Usually the compressed drive is C:, which is seen by the system as a normal, bootable hard disk.
Although you can access drive H:, I think you will find little or no free space left on it, depending on the amount of compression used.
This is because its space is occupied by the compressed file which is "drive C:", and the system files mentioned above.

Now, for a solution to your problem:

It is possible to have partitions as large as 2.1Gb using Win95A's FAT16.  Therefore, I would FDISK the new drive and create two partitions.
Next, it is possible to use Windows95 to copy itself, preserving all data and applications, from your current drive C: to the new drive's primary partition. (This partition to later become drive C:)
When that's finished, just set up the new drive on the primary IDE channel and make it bootable.
Reconnect the old drive as slave, or to the secondary channel if you wish, for additional storage space.
I would re-format it to get rid of the drive compression.  That way, you'll be ready to go to FAT32 when you  upgrade to Win98.
The new drive will contain C: & E:, with the old drive and CDROM becoming D: & F:, respectively.
Let me know if you want the details on how to make the copy using tools that you already have at hand.

Regards,
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756383
Ralph.
Thanks for the info.  On my system C: is the original uncompressed drive, and H: is a compressed drive which is hosted onto C:.  At the time I did it I had software which would not run off a compressed drive so I retained a large portion of the drive uncompressed.   Over time I have increased the size of the compressed area.
I think that I have decided to partition the drive as a 2GB, 1GB and two 0.5GB partitions, using the smaller ones for data which tends to be mainly many small files.   I will copy c: to the 2MB partition, sys it and then move it to the primary IDE controller.  My main problem is the current H: drive which contains a large amount of software, much of which I suspect will have to be uninstalled and re-installed on the new C: or D: partitions.   I have tried mover98 to move a few programs but with somewhat limited success as may parts seem to get left behind.

Regards John.

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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1756384
Hmmmmm,
I wonder what might have made you select H: as the driveletter for the compressed drive.  Are you certain it's not the way I described? (H: is the host drive for C:)
What does FDISK say when you use it to display your partitions on the old drive?
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756385
Ralph.
The reason for h:  was that earlier letters were occupied by network drives.
Regards John.
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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756386
Ralph.
You mentioned that it is possible to get W95 to copy itself to a new partition.   Normally I would use xcopy in DOS, but this does not copy hidden files and so it requires a lot of messing about with batch files to change attributes etc.   How do you get W95 to replicate itself?

Regards John.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756387
Yes, I think Xcopy is a pain for copying everying. (you must convert long filenames, etc, etc)
Win95 can be used to transfer your present operating setup to another drive using tools you already have.
Since this is something aside from your original question, I suggest you deal with it first, and then I'll be glad to give you the details.
If the proposed answer hasn't solved your problem, you can re-open the question.
Regards,
Ralph


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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756388
Ralph.
Sorry I do not understand what you mean by deal with it first ??
Should I close a question and then open another on or what ?
some of the mysteries of expers exchange are not obvious.
Regards John.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1756389
John,
Okay, if the current proposed answer does not solve your problem, then you should re-open the question which will allow other experts to be able to submit an answer.
I'm not trying to hold you up for the points, but many times an incorrect answer is mistakenly accepted by new questioners.
The reason for it is because they don't understand the way E-E works.
If you close the question by grading the current answer, then the points are awarded to the person who proposed it......  something which can't be reversed.
If your question has been answered to your satisfaction, then by all means, accept it.
If you now have a new problem you should post a new question for that problem.  Something I won't require you to do.
I need a little time to put my answer together, but I'll post it here for you soon.
In the mean time, you figure out what to do about the points.
Regards,
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:jcolles
ID: 1756390
Thanks for the explanation
John.
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