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Allocation memory

What does the (char *) do in this sample program?

#include<stdlib.h>

main()
{
char *str;
if ((str= (char *) malloc(100)) ==NULL)
 {
   printf("not enough memory to allocate buffer\n");
   exit(1);
 }
printf("String was allocated");
return 0;
}
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program
Asked:
program
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1 Solution
 
programAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question
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nietodCommented:
answer coming.
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nietodCommented:
The return value of malloc() is a pointer of type "void *".  This means it doesn't point to any defined type.  This is because malloc doesn't know what you want to use the memory for, so it returns this, sort of, generic pointer.    you must convert this pointer to something useful.  You do this using a type cast, which is to put a type name inside of parenthesis before the thing to be changed.  For example.

int i;
char *CPtr1  = &i; // error &i is an int* pointer, not a char * pointer.
char *CPtr2 =  (char *) &i; // Okay converted from int * to char *.

you can also use this with non-pointers, like

double D = 5;
char c = (char) D; // convert D to a char.

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programAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answer.  This question stumped many people at my
office who have C knowledge.
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nietodCommented:
One thing I should have said and didn't is that the new operator is type safe and malloc is not.   That is new creates memory of a particular type and returns a pointer to that type.  This is much better than malloc.  A C++ program should never need to use malloc()  (except in the case of implimenting operator new).
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