Solved

Font Size verus TextField Bounds

Posted on 1998-06-15
4
323 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-03
I always seem to have to edit, compile, run, edit, compile, run, etc...
when trying to get the TextField box to not cut off the text in it.

Is there any determinant way to set the bounds (height) of a TextField so that
the text that gets displayed in it doesn't get cut off.

I also need it to be platform and resolution independent.

I have tried three platforms:  Windows95, Linux (X), Solaris (CDE).
Windows handles it the best; whereis Solaris the worst.

0
Comment
Question by:mag062397
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:imladris
ID: 1223211
Is the problem determining what height to set the TextField to, or getting the TextField to conform to the height you know it needs to be?

0
 

Author Comment

by:mag062397
ID: 1223212
Setting the TextField height so that it is large enough
to display the font, yet not too large.

That is, does there exist a constant, ?, such that
textField.setBounds(x, y, w, fontSize+?) is large enough
to display the font correctly and that ? is the smallest
constant that exists.

The answer probably depends on the font and/or fontsize; because
I tried setting the height to 25, font family to "TimesRoman" and
it displayed correctly for sizes 1-8 and 10 but not 9.  Strange!?

0
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
imladris earned 150 total points
ID: 1223213
If you get a FontMetric for the font (in the Graphics class public FontMetrics getFontMetrics(Font f)) you can get the font height from it (public int getHeight()). There are also calls for getting the maximum ascent and descent (space above and below "regular" characters needed for this font.
This should allow for much more accuracy than a number based on font size.

0
 

Author Comment

by:mag062397
ID: 1223214
Yes, I'll do that -- Thanks!
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Java contains several comparison operators (e.g., <, <=, >, >=, ==, !=) that allow you to compare primitive values. However, these operators cannot be used to compare the contents of objects. Interface Comparable is used to allow objects of a cl…
Introduction This article is the last of three articles that explain why and how the Experts Exchange QA Team does test automation for our web site. This article covers our test design approach and then goes through a simple test case example, how …
Viewers learn about the “for” loop and how it works in Java. By comparing it to the while loop learned before, viewers can make the transition easily. You will learn about the formatting of the for loop as we write a program that prints even numbers…
Excel styles will make formatting consistent and let you apply and change formatting faster. In this tutorial, you'll learn how to use Excel's built-in styles, how to modify styles, and how to create your own. You'll also learn how to use your custo…

695 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question