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setup options

Posted on 1998-07-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
i'm trying to setup FreeBsd for the first time.. i've downlaoded the bin, floppies, and manpages directories..

i created a fat partition on my harddrive about 200 megs and put everything in a FreeBSD directory on the new fat partition..

i booted with the floppy which worked fine and got me into the setup

problem is, when i getinto the setup and go past the "last chance" screen, i start getting errors like "must specify / in the editor" or something like that, then after a few more errors saying the /usr/ dir and such aren't there (which i assume isn't a problem) setup fails because there were errors..

my guess is i'm not setting something right in the options menu?  is there anything i can do to fix this?
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Question by:rabbitears
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xterm earned 50 total points
ID: 1628343
When you set up your partitions, one of the fields is
"mount point" - you _must_ go in there and label one of
them as "/".  By default FreeBSD would like you to split
up your filesystem into multiple partitions, so you will
still get errors like "/usr not found" and "/var not found",
but you can safely ignore them (it will install on /)

Not sure what this has to do with linux, but theres your
answer :)
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