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[@$]

Posted on 1998-07-17
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Last Modified: 2010-03-05
I'm reading a manual on sybperl, a sybase module for perl. One function returns a reference to a static array (a row from the database) and this reference is stored in $d.
The manual says that to copy the array into a list of arrays, I need to do something like:

push(@rows, [@$d]) ;

My understanding is that the @ dereferences $d, while the [] create a reference to the list.
How and why does the procedure above create a copy of the array that $d references instead of just referencing the same thing? In other words, why is [@$d] not the same thing as $d?
Thanks,

Robert
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Question by:lendvai
2 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:alamo
ID: 1208489
As I understand it, the [] produces a reference to an anonymous array, not the original array. Compare that to \@$d which I think would be equivalent to $d.
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Accepted Solution

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b2pi earned 100 total points
ID: 1208490
Basically, [@$d] makes a copy of the array referenced by $d, and returns a reference to it.

A good way of playing with these things is to use the perl debugger:


(frev40)/u/[4]%perl -dw
 
Loading DB routines from perl5db.pl version 1.01
Emacs support available.
 
Enter h or `h h' for help.
 
use strict;
 
my(@a, $d, @rows);
@a = (1,2,3);
$d = \@a;
push(@rows, $d); # Puts the scalar $d (a reference to @a) on @rows
push(@rows, @$d); # puts the values in $d onto @rows);
push(@rows, [@$d]); #puts a reference to a copy of $d on @rows
 
$d->[0] = 10;
 
print "All Done\n";
^D [^Z for Win32]
 
main::(-:3):    my(@a, $d, @rows);
  DB<1> n
main::(-:4):    @a = (1,2,3);
  DB<1> n
main::(-:5):    $d = \@a;
  DB<1> n
main::(-:6):    push(@rows, $d); # Puts the scalar $d (a reference to @a) on @rows
  DB<1> n
main::(-:7):    push(@rows, @$d); # puts the values in $d onto @rows);
  DB<1> n
main::(-:8):    push(@rows, [@$d]); #puts a reference to a copy of $d on @rows
  DB<1> n
main::(-:10):   $d->[0] = 10;
  DB<1> n
main::(-:12):   print "All Done\n";
  DB<1> x @rows
0  ARRAY(0x18c924)
   0  10
   1  2
   2  3
1  1
2  2
3  3
4  ARRAY(0xb3948)
   0  1
   1  2
   2  3
  DB<2> q


Shows the difference pretty well... By the way, I generally recommend that people not use sybperl, and go directly to using DBlib ...
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