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Access 95 Security Basics

Posted on 1998-07-21
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Last Modified: 2006-11-17
Currently, we have a SITES. mdb file and its associated ldb file residing on a file server.  All of the users (50) connect internally to this mdb file over the network.  Each workstation has Access installed on it.  I am at the point where I need security on this mdb file but have the following questions:

Since the Jet engine is on each individual workstation, how do I setup central security?  If I setup a copy of Access on the file server, does that handle the security for all workstations?  What about other users of that file server that have Access applications that have nothing to do with SITES? Will they then be asked to log on to their applications? What happens if security is setup on the SITES.mdb file and a user creates a new database at their workstation?  Would they then have to log in to their new database or would their be no security yet on the new mdb file?  One of my resources is the Access 95 Developer's Handbook by Litwin and Getz, but it doesn't answer these overview type questions.
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Question by:rbrow
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islitsa earned 100 total points
ID: 1976954
here is how it works for my db:
1.i set up a central security on my server using wrkadm.exe file for the workgroup. by default, this file handles security for ALL access applications for ALL the workstations connected to the server.  yes, it looks really dangeraous because if i do so, the users will have to log on to EVERY access application.  each new db created by a user will require by default the same security because the security is network set.  poor users will not be able to handle any even simple applications .
2.here is the way to go around it: shell scripting
you go to your microsoft office folder, get to access icon[startup icon], right click and click :create a shortcut.
then you go to the new shortcut and click properties. in the properties window you look at the target line and that's what you write there:
"location of your access icon [startup icon] "/NOSTARTUP "location of your database on the network"/wrkgrp "location of your mdw file" ( mdw file is a file where you set your workgroup profile, you can learn about it in access help real easy, just type in security and then under security choose workgroups)

here is the example of my database shell scripting for windows 95
"C\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\MSACCESS.EXE"/NOSTARTUP "C:\Irina's Stuff\db2.mdb"/wrkgrp "C\Irina's Stuff\Irina.mdw"
it works the same way for the network security.

hope it helps at all :)
sincerely,
irina
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by:rbrow
ID: 1976955
Thanks for the answer.  Does the mdw file reside on the server or on each workstation?  If a user tries to access the database on the server from anywhere other than the icon that you have scripted, what happens?
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Expert Comment

by:islitsa
ID: 1976956
the mdw file resides on the server, put in the same folder where workadm.exe is and then reference it in the target .
you put the shortcut on the network where you would put the database and you hide the real database, don't let the users know that this is just a shortcut, let them think it is a real database icon.  therefore, the only way to access the database for them will be through the shortcut, meaning they will have to go through the security.  for instance in my company, i put the database on the server  in one folder, and the shortcut i can put in another folder called database.  then i tell the users: " go to the folder "database" and access the icon called "the company database"".  they go and they have to log on the database because the workadm.exe makes  them log on.
read about workadmin, it tells you everything besides the line i wrote you, myself i spent about 5 hours to find this script.
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