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Uninstallig Linux

Posted on 1998-07-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I had Red Hat 5.1and Win95 OSR2 (FAT16) installed. I wanted to to Unistall Linux so I deleted it's partitions with Linux fdisk and used the option /MBR with DOS fdisk. But now I not able to increase my Win95 partition. My DOS (WIN95)  fdisk recognize my HD with 2.0 Gb (it's right) but there is only one partition with 1.2 Gb and the rest it says it's free. Now I don't know what else to do... So if some one could Help me I would appriciate it. Thanks Anyway.
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Question by:breves
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t2pp earned 50 total points
ID: 1628536
breves - create an extented partition using DOS fdisk. Then create 1 or more logical partition in the extented partition.
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