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VPICD.VXD Problems

Posted on 1998-07-29
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I am using Windows98 Final US and getting a strange DirectX(?) or display driver related problem: Each time I access DirectDraw applications (media player, starcraft) I get sudden lock-ups with blue screens. I am using a Matrox Millenium 1 (OEM 175m MHz) with most recent BIOS and the offical final 4.11 drivers - i even did a whole reinstall (!) but the problem remains. Also tried uninstalling the Millenium drivers and tried MS's - no change in behaviour. It is not related to PCI IRQ sharing as it was my first thought, i disabled COM ports to even check that out.
Other PCI devices: on-board USB, on-board eide controller, 3Com 90x NIC, 2x Voodoo2 12 MB (no IRQs). Non-PCI-Devices: Terratec EWS64S soundcard, Sedlbauer AG ISDN speedWin card. Board: Asus P2B (BX Chipset). No AGP graphics card yet.
BTW: Win98 always reserves an IRQ for my Millenium1, even it does not need one. I turned it of in BIOS, but Win98 does not care. :) Same with USB.
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Question by:marcial
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17 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643269
You guys are my last help possible... :)
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Expert Comment

by:dankh
ID: 1643270
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643271
No, that does not help at all:
I already searched the ms kb but i did not find anything related to my problem.
The first links deals with win95 direct x issues that are all not about that crashes i get.
It is a clean system with w98 with fresh drivers and in win98 I cannot reinstall DirectX.
The other links covers multiple display adapters that I do not use - just a single Matrox Millenium PCI card.
Anyone else?
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Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1643272
Check this out marcial,
=======
This program has performed an illegal operation and will be shut down.
  A FATAL EXCEPTION HAS OCCURED AT . . .
  Invalid Page Fault...
  The Big Ugly "BLUE SCREEN" again.

  Due to the many possible scenarios that can cause these messages to appear on your
  screen, not everyone will find a cure here.. and sometimes these errors are caused by
  bugs in a particular piece of software.   When that is the case, the only cure might be to
  stop using that program.

  Most of the time however, the causes are traceable to a conflict between two pieces of
  software or a conflict between two modules within Windows itself or disk errors which are
  frequently caused by powering off without properly shutting down. They also tend to
  accumulate no matter what over a period of months. If over time you are noticing more
  frequent errors, always run Scandisk with the "thorough" and "automatically fix errors"
  options selected as a first step.

  Video cards and their drivers are a common source of General Protection Faults. Always
  check the Web site of your video card manufacturer for updated drivers and information
  as a possible fix. Specifically, this type of error is often caused by a conflict between a
  program, (usually games or other graphic intensive software) and the accelerator chip of
  the video card. If you already have visited that manufacturers site and got the latest
  drivers and have checked for known issues listed there, the workaround is often to
  disable the accelerator chip on the video card. Look in your video card's utility software
  for an option to disable it. Then disable it through Windows by opening Control Panel,
  click on "System", click on "Performance", click on "Graphics". There you will see a
  slider labeled "Hardware Acceleration". Drag it all the way to the Left to disable it. Click
  OK. You will probably need to reboot for it to take effect.

  Third party screen-savers are another common source of system crashes. If you're
  serious about pursuing maximum system stability, get rid of them.

  Conflicts can take the form of two modules each trying to use the same block of
  memory, or two modules issuing mutually exclusive conflicting instructions to the
  operating system. Crash protection programs such as "CrashGuard" usually do just the
  opposite of what they are supposed to do. What they are best at is crashing your
  system. Windows doesn't need them. Get rid of them.

  One of the biggest and most easily fixed causes of general protection faults is having too
  many unneeded protocols installed in the Dial-up Networking properties panel.. To check
  for this, click Control Panel. Click "Network". You should see a list of installed network
  components. If you have a regular ISP and you are using the Windows 95 TCP/IP
  connection to the Internet, and you are not on a LAN you should have only three items
  showing on that list.

  * Client for Microsoft Networks
  * Dial-Up Adapter
  * TCP/IP

  If you have AOL installed, you will also see "AOL Adapter".  AOL being installed might
  also decrease your TCP/IP reliability.

  If you have Microsoft Personal Web Server, that will be there too.

  If you see NetBEUI or IPX/SPX or anything else on the list, highlight it and click
  "Remove"

  Write down the changes just in case.

  Next, highlight TCP/IP, Click "Properties",
  * Click the DNS Configuration tab.
  * Click the box that says: "Disable DNS"
  * Click the "WINS Configuration" tab
  * Click "Disable WINS Resolution
  * Click "OK"

  Now reboot and put your system to the test. You may be amazed at the improvement.

  There is one peculiar aspect of Win95 worth noting that can also cause the system to
  crash. Windows normally controls it's disk cache automatically and determines the size
  of it by the amount of available ram. If you have an usually large amount of RAM,
  say..over 48Mb, Windows may allocate too much ram to the cache. For reasons thusfar
  unexplained, too large a cache can cause problems, including total system crashes. It
  may also be responsible for sluggish overall system performance. This cache, called
  VCACHE, can be controlled from SYSTEM.INI

  This letter below is one from a previous posting:

  I'm getting an unusual error while booting W95:
  "a fatal exception 0E has occured at 0028:C002979A in VXD VCACHE(01) + 000003E2.
  The current application will
  be terminated "..etc . .but when I press a key to continue the whole system hangs,so all
  I have to do is to reboot. It's not from corrupt files (I formmated my disk and set up
  everything from scratch)

  If all your peripherals have updated drivers with no conflicts on the motherboard,and
  generally everything is just fine except for this -sickening- blue screen appearring with a
  75% possibility every time you boot up. I suggested the following ..which has fixed this
  problem:

  Open SYSTEM.INI for editing. Look for the following section: [vcache]. Then add the
  following two lines right below it. It should look like the following when done:
  [VCACHE] FOR 16mg
  MinFileCache=4096
  MaxFileCache=4096

  [vcache] FOR 32mg and so on
  MinFileCache=8192
  MaxFileCache=8192

  These values represent the size of the cache, in KB The address that your system
  reports the error sounds suspiciously like that belonging to video ram. As a first step, try
  disabling the disk cache by setting both numbers to 0. Then try 1024, 2048, and 4096 to
  find which works best. If you are using any memory managers such as QEMM386 or
  EMM386, try disabling it.. They are not needed at all except for certain DOS programs.
  They might be conflicting with a system device or Windows module.

See, "Error Messages and Fixes" at http://www.geocities.com/~budallen/

Bud
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643273
I regret, but this has nothing to do with my question. I have poitend out that I have the latest drivers, I have standard values (NONE!) in Vcache settings (nothing to do with it) and have read that geocities text before.

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Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1643274
marcial,
This is the important part of my answer.
--------Try it.
Video cards and their drivers are a common source of General Protection Faults. Always
check the Web site of your video card manufacturer for updated drivers and information
as a possible fix. Specifically, this type of error is often caused by a conflict between a
program, (usually games or other graphic intensive software) and the accelerator chip of
the video card. If you already have visited that manufacturers site and got the latest
drivers and have checked for known issues listed there, the workaround is often to
disable the accelerator chip on the video card. Look in your video card's utility software
for an option to disable it. Then disable it through Windows by opening Control Panel,
click on "System", click on "Performance", click on "Graphics". There you will see a
slider labeled "Hardware Acceleration". Drag it all the way to the Left to disable it. Click
OK. You will probably need to reboot for it to take effect.

Regards
Bud

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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:wayneb
ID: 1643275
If you are not using the usb hub then disable his hardware profile and see what happens, I think you may have a conflict with the usb hardware, It will not hurt to give it a shot and then after disabling it reboot computer and try to recreate the problem.

Good Luck
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643276
smeebud: Yes, I do have the latest video driver. Hardware acceleration slider is not connected to DirectDraw issues. And even disbling direct draw acceleration does not fix that problem.

wayneb: best try yet! that was the reason for similar problem using windows 95 osr 2.1 - the crappy usb drivers of 95 convinced me to try 98 and i checked it twice: they are not the cause ofthe problem. Strangely enough I get the impression that is has something to do with network drivers!??!... after disbaling all network stuff i was not bale to recreate the blue screen...

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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:smeebud
ID: 1643277
You're not reading my whole comment.
Did you try turning your;
Hardware Acceleration". Drag it all the way to the Left to disable it. Click
      OK. You will probably need to reboot for it to take effect.

Bud
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643278
Yes I did that. It did not change anything. Problem remained. (I even tried that once before I posted this message).
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Expert Comment

by:nbdyfool
ID: 1643279
Is it the network drivers, or network card?   It could be either.  I've found that with 3Com Nic cards, pay attention to the settings and resources...they can be a pain, and cause a lot of seemingly unrelated grief.  I take it that you're on a network, otherwise, why have the Nic card? Can the resource settings be modified for either the Video card or the Nic card?  Plug and Play is great when it works, a pain in the a__ when it doesn't!
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Expert Comment

by:dankh
ID: 1643280
Marcial,

   This is what VPICD stands for: Virtual Programmable Interrupt Controller Device.

"VXD" means "virtual device driver". VPICD is the specific VXD that is giving you the error. If you can identify which device this refers to, you should reinstall the device in Windows. To me, VPICD indicates the CD-ROM system. I know, how can the video affect the CD-ROM system? Windows has a strange habit of doing just that.

After installing the new video card and drivers, did you reinstall your DirectX drivers? You probably ought to redo QuickTime32 as well. It is a long shot, but remove your cd-rom and reinstall it.
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643281
This is 98 -> you cannot reinstal DirectX. The 3COm Settings are default.
After all I doubt than ANYONE read my message: I did several complete Win98 reinstalls from the scratch. From the scratch!
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Expert Comment

by:DT0M
ID: 1643282
I had this problem, I can see you aren't disabling the right drivers. You are using a 3D card ci? The direct draw acceleration isn't the problem, hardware acceleration is. You need to disable acceleration on the 2D card, do this in control panel and then display if hardware acceleration isn't there then go to system, performance and then graphics and disable it from there. To put acceleration back on you need to wait untill the card manufacturer has made a new driver that works properly, that's what I did anyway.
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Expert Comment

by:Chance2
ID: 1643283
Do you have DirectX 6.0? You may want to bring those up to the latest version.
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Author Comment

by:marcial
ID: 1643284
After weeks, I managed to solve the problem myself.
It was not the grpahics driver as I thought, rather an reaction of the graphics card to a bug (mem leak or whatever) in the sound card driver of the terratec ews-64s. i worked fine in game direct x mode, the music mode made those problems.
so how can i share my points to some of you guys who tried to help me?
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Accepted Solution

by:
dankh earned 150 total points
ID: 1643285
Marcial,

   Since you solved your own problem and no one has taken you up on the points, please have this question deleted.  Go to customer support @

http://www.experts-exchange.com/topics/experts-exchange/
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