Solved

x-settings in red hat 5.0

Posted on 1998-08-01
2
244 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-06
i installed red hat 5.0, the questions are:
1: i am using Xfree86 server for my cirrus logic(supported) video card and compaq 151FS monitor(unlisted, custom) and got the setting for 8bit, 16 bit and 24bit screen size, and when x window starts it's in 8bits(1024x768, i think) mode.now how can i switch to 16bit or 24 bit pixel depth mode with smaller screen size(like 800x600)? i tried ctrl-alt-+ suggested by server setup but not working.i really don't like this 8 bit screen. and BTW with previous red hat 3.0 i used MetroX and it seems much faster than XFree86 server. is this true?(the x manager is fvwm under both cases)
2.how do i adjust the xterm attributes , fonts. size,colors(fg, bg, menu bars)? where is the font library i can look at and choose?i checked the /usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/XTerm
and can't find the line to define the font used in xterm, there is only one line for menu bar.
3. what do you think about aterstep? i was told it's much slower though looks better.
4. this is not about X, how can i make boot floppies without the original CDROM and after the installation?
thanks.
0
Comment
Question by:smiley020999
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:mlev
ID: 1637691
1. Ctrl-Alt-+ only changes resolution, not pixel depth. The latter cannot be changed dynamically in XFree86. You need to specify it when you start the X server, e.g. startx -- -bpp 16 or startx -- -bpp 24
4. mkbootdisk
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
sikander earned 50 total points
ID: 1637692
1. You can do it by editing the /etc/X11/XF86Config file. Go to the very end of the file, and search for the Section "Screen" for the accelerated servers. Then, under that section, find the "Depth" line and change it to your needs (supported: 8, 16, 24).
That should do it.

2. As the man page says, only fixed-fonts are supported. You change the name of the font displayed via the -fn <fontname> argument, eg.
xterm -fn 9x15bold  (and xterm will start with 9x15bold font).

You can find the names of the fonts with xfontsel program.

3. I used AfterStep 1.0 for a long time, and I find it very fast and very configurable. I like the idea of totally configurable toolbox (although to big for my taste) but AfterStep lacks the icons on the desktop. I found that in KDE.

4. Use a tool mkbootdisk.


0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
In my business, I use the LTS (Long Term Support) versions of Linux. My workstations do real work, and so I rarely have the patience to deal with silly problems caused by an upgraded kernel that had experimental software on it to begin with from a r…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

729 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question