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x-settings in red hat 5.0

Posted on 1998-08-01
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
i installed red hat 5.0, the questions are:
1: i am using Xfree86 server for my cirrus logic(supported) video card and compaq 151FS monitor(unlisted, custom) and got the setting for 8bit, 16 bit and 24bit screen size, and when x window starts it's in 8bits(1024x768, i think) mode.now how can i switch to 16bit or 24 bit pixel depth mode with smaller screen size(like 800x600)? i tried ctrl-alt-+ suggested by server setup but not working.i really don't like this 8 bit screen. and BTW with previous red hat 3.0 i used MetroX and it seems much faster than XFree86 server. is this true?(the x manager is fvwm under both cases)
2.how do i adjust the xterm attributes , fonts. size,colors(fg, bg, menu bars)? where is the font library i can look at and choose?i checked the /usr/lib/X11/app-defaults/XTerm
and can't find the line to define the font used in xterm, there is only one line for menu bar.
3. what do you think about aterstep? i was told it's much slower though looks better.
4. this is not about X, how can i make boot floppies without the original CDROM and after the installation?
thanks.
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Question by:smiley020999
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by:mlev
ID: 1637691
1. Ctrl-Alt-+ only changes resolution, not pixel depth. The latter cannot be changed dynamically in XFree86. You need to specify it when you start the X server, e.g. startx -- -bpp 16 or startx -- -bpp 24
4. mkbootdisk
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sikander earned 50 total points
ID: 1637692
1. You can do it by editing the /etc/X11/XF86Config file. Go to the very end of the file, and search for the Section "Screen" for the accelerated servers. Then, under that section, find the "Depth" line and change it to your needs (supported: 8, 16, 24).
That should do it.

2. As the man page says, only fixed-fonts are supported. You change the name of the font displayed via the -fn <fontname> argument, eg.
xterm -fn 9x15bold  (and xterm will start with 9x15bold font).

You can find the names of the fonts with xfontsel program.

3. I used AfterStep 1.0 for a long time, and I find it very fast and very configurable. I like the idea of totally configurable toolbox (although to big for my taste) but AfterStep lacks the icons on the desktop. I found that in KDE.

4. Use a tool mkbootdisk.


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