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Help! My Kernal Crashed and I have LILO. I want to get rid of it!

Posted on 1998-08-03
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I have Lilo on my comp, and I wanted to get rid of it. I tried deleting Linux, but now i have a scerwed up partition (Taking up 600 Megs that i need) and a LILO boot that goes to Linux when i forget to type "win". But since Linux is not there, my comp crashes. Any ideas on how to solve these problems? I am willing to pay more then promised if it is desired. I need this to start working!
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Question by:RubAWay
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tim_lbi earned 800 total points
ID: 1637700
Boot from a DOS/Windows floppy disk, and use 'fdisk /mbr' to restore your MBR. With fdisk set as active partition the windows one.

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by:RubAWay
ID: 1637701
Thanx sooooo much. If you need more pts, just tell me, and i can give more! Thank You so much!
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