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synchronizing clocks on diff. machines

I have a bunch of different machines running different OS's
and I was wondering if there's an easy way of synchronizing
all the clocks and keeping them synchronized.  Or perhaps is
there a way for one machine to "broadcast" the time to all
others?
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ladioss
Asked:
ladioss
1 Solution
 
ozoCommented:
do all the OS's support timed?
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lucidityCommented:
NT servers will respond to the "net time" command.

net time \\NTSName /set /yes

I don't know if UNIX will make this call, anyway, I put that in my start up to synch to the server.

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ahoffmannCommented:
lucidity, why do you post M$ proprietary answres in a UNIX topic?
It's even just half the trouth, it won't work this way in a default M$ setup.

timed (as ozo said) is the solution, available for most M$ products too ;-))
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ladiossAuthor Commented:
I'm not familiar in that area...how would i get it to work if it
supports timed?  These machines are not running NT, but unix
os's.
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ahoffmannCommented:
timed works in master-slave mode (IRIX also supports primary and secondary masters).

You start timed as master on one machine, and as slave on all others. timed can be configured via options how to synchronize, see man-page for details.
Be prepared that it has different options on different platforms.
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almasyCommented:
For all of your Unix systems I would recommend setting up a root cron job (use "crontab -e" as root) that runs the "rdate" command periodically to query the time from a common host.

The syntax for "rdate" is:

    rdate -s hostname

Where "hostname" is the name of the machine to query, and the "-s" parameter may not be needed for some flavors of Unix (it can be left off for Solaris and SunOS).

For internet-connected systems there are a number of public machines to query.  The one I usually use is "time.mit.edu", so the crontab entry that I have set up under Solaris is:

    45 4 * * * /usr/bin/rdate time.mit.edu > /dev/null

Which updates the system time at 4:45am each day.

It may also be desirable to invoke rdate from the startup scripts on each machine and/or to increase the frequency of cron invocations, if you're concerned about the clocks always being synchronized.
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ladiossAuthor Commented:
Actually, i already have it answered by ozo.  Timed was the answer and I have it working on all 6 different OS's now even
though it was a pain with all the different options on the different platforms like ahoffmann said.  sorry that i couldn't give you the points though, ozo.

thanks to all!
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