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Copy CD to CD

I intend to do :
- Copy data from my harddisk to a CD : copy all of data to a directory then copy this directory to CD ( because CD can be  written only one time )
- Copy data from a CD (CD1) to another CD (CD2) : copy CD1 to the harddisk, then copy from harddisk to CD2.
Are that all right ?
In the second situation, if CD1 is a COPYRIGHT CD (e.g VC++ 5.0 ), is that good for CD2, can I use copied CD2 to install VC++ into other harddisk ? (you know I'm a student :-) )  
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nhcuong
Asked:
nhcuong
1 Solution
 
rmarottaCommented:
In the first part of your question, yes, it is possible to copy files from the hard drive to the CD.

Next, if you copy files from one CD1 to the hard drive, then copy those files to CD2, you are doing the same thing again.

> "can I use copied CD2 to install VC++ into other harddisk ? "

It MIGHT be possible to install a program from the copied CD.

It would depend on whether you have copied all necessary files and placed everything on the copy to make an install program run properly.

Let me know if you need more.
Ralph
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datnCommented:
What program are you using to make the CD's? The standard program is usually CD Creator or Easy CD Pro from Adaptec, which allows you to "drag and drop" without having to copy all your data into one directory before you make the CD.
A suggestion is to pick up a cheap CDROM for $20 at a used computer parts store and do direct copy from CD to CD.
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timmiCommented:
CD to CD will be really slow.Copy to your HDD then burn the CD.If you set the CD burner
software to miultisession you can burn more than once just adding it to the last session.
The cost for this is about 15MB for each session but it's good in case you miss a needed
file for an install.Yes you most definitely can "install" a program from a burned CD.If you
copy files directly from the CD make sure to change the attributes to archive afterwards
otherwise they will remain read-only.Matter of fact when I ran Win 3.11 I copied my whole
HDD to CD and then when I wanted a clean install I would xcopy the whole CD and be
up and running in about ten minutes.Make sure you defrag BEFORE burning this will
eliminate buffer under runs which can fry a CD into a coaster.Try to do a test burn first to see if your system is up to par.It takes a little longer but it can save you from wasting CD's.
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rmarottaCommented:
> "CD to CD will be really slow"  
I don't understand why you say that.
The CD-R must have data transfered to it at it's recording speed, no matter what the source is.
If set to single-speed record, or 2x, or whatever, the source must keep data supplied or there will be a buffer underrun, resulting in an unusable disk.

Ralph
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nhcuongAuthor Commented:
Oh, speed - I don't know that. What should I set speed while copying CD so that
I can use in the future with any speed CD driver ?
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rmarottaCommented:
Your CD recorder's recording speed will be determined by the software used for the recording.  Most programs won't allow you to select a speed higher than the recorder is capable of.
This means that 2x recorders will have the option of recording at either single or double speed.  4x recorders will have the 4-speed option added to that, and so on.
Ralph
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