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Outlook  folder permissions

Posted on 1998-08-18
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
In an Exchange 5.0 with 95/NT environment the default permissions for mailbox folders is none.  Why can everyone still see/open everyone else's mailbox folders?
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Question by:tbtaylor
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Expert Comment

by:danyell
ID: 1621387
It's not the default permissions that matter in this case -- those would only affect new users. The permissions on existing mailboxes would be whatever was set up by the administrator at the time those mailboxes where created.

Have you tried creating a new (perhaps bogus/test) user in Exchange Admin and checking to see if existing users could peer into that *new* user's folders?

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Author Comment

by:tbtaylor
ID: 1621388
Yes. Exsisting users can see into new user folders, and vice versa.
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Expert Comment

by:danyell
ID: 1621389
This could be a genuine bug in Exchange. Have you applied Service Pack 2? Have you considered upgrading to Exchange 5.5? Also, what are your Windows NT file system (FAT vs. NTFS) and security model (workgroup vs. domain)? These can affect the proper functioning of Exchange security features.

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Expert Comment

by:omb
ID: 1621390
You may wish to check out the following sections - hopefully they will help you get a fully understanding of Exchange permissions...>

Items marked Private in Microsoft Outlook 97 are viewable by a delegate who uses a mail client other than Outlook, such as the Microsoft Exchange Client. However, delegates using Outlook cannot view private messages.
 
CAUSE
=====
This behavior is by design. Outlook items are only private to other Outlook users.
 
RESOLUTION
==========
Assign only Outlook users as your delegates.
 
Steps to Reproduce Problem
--------------------------
 
1. Give Reviewer rights to another user.
 
a. Right-click your Inbox.
b. On the shortcut menu, click Properties.
c. On the Permissions tab, click Add and add a delegate user.
d. In the Roles list, click Reviewer and click OK.
 
2. Send yourself a private message.
 
a. On the Compose menu, click New Mail Message.
b. On the Options tab, click Private in the Sensitivity list.
c. Complete and send the mail message to yourself.
 
RESULT: If your delegate uses Outlook, they cannot see your private message. If your delegate uses another mail client, such as Exchange, they can see your private message.

To access another user's calendar or other folder when you are using the Corporate Workgroup installation of Microsoft Outlook 98:
 
- You must use Microsoft Exchange Server as your mail service.
- The shared folder must be stored in the Exchange Server mailbox.
- The shared folder must have access permissions assigned.
 
To Assign Access Permissions to Contacts, Inbox, Journal, Notes, and Tasks:
 
1. On the View menu, click Folder List if the list is not displayed.
 
2. Click to select the desired folder in the Folder List.
 
2. On the File menu, point to Folder and click Properties.
 
3. Click the Permissions tab.
 
4. Click Add to add the name of the user you want to grant access to, or choose Default.
 
5. Set the desired permissions.
 
6. Click OK.
 
Permissions affect what you are able to view.
 
A user with permissions of None or Contributor will only be able to see that you have scheduled Tentative, Busy or Out of Office time. The user will not be able to see what you enter into the subject line of an appointment; this is true for all four appointment sensitivity levels: Normal, Personal, Private, and Confidential.
 
A user with Owner, Author, Publishing Author, Editor, Publishing Editor, and Reviewer permissions will be able to see what you enter in the Subject Line for all appointments and meetings. This is true for all four sensitivity levels.
 
To set the sensitivity level of an appointment or meeting, open a new item, and on the File menu, click Properties.
 
Accessing the Primary Folder of Another User
--------------------------------------------
 
1. On the File menu, point to Open, and click Other User's Folder.
 
2. In the Name box, type the name of the person who owns the folder or click Name to select from a list of users.
 
3. In the Folder box, click the folder you want to open, and click OK.
 
In order to share other than the five default Mailbox folders, Contacts, Inbox, Journal, Notes, and Tasks you must share the entire Mailbox. This will give access to subfolders as well as the five primary folders.
 
Assigning Access Permissions to Your Mailbox
--------------------------------------------
 
1. In the Folder List, click your Mailbox - <name> folder.
 
2. On the File menu, point to Folder and click Properties for <folder name>.
 
3. Click the Permissions tab.
 
4. Add the name of the user you want to grant access to, or click to select Default.
 
5. In the Permissions area, select the desired options, and click OK.
 
Opening the Mailbox by Another User
-----------------------------------
 
1. On the Tools menu, click Services.
 
2. Click Microsoft Exchange Server in the service list and click
   Properties.
 
3. On the Advanced tab, click Add.
 
4. Type the name of the Mailbox owner in Add Mailbox.
 
5. Click OK and OK.
 
This displays the Mailbox in the Folders list. Double-click the Mailbox name and click the desired folder. Individual folders must have access permission assigned as in the "To Assign Access Permissions to Contacts, Inbox, Journal, Notes, and Tasks" section above.
 
Also see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q179681 "OL98: Using Hyperlinks to Access Outlook Folders and Items"

Hope these comments help.
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Accepted Solution

by:
TSauer earned 100 total points
ID: 1621391
In Exchange Admin , check the permission of the recepient containers, everybody who have at least user rights to this container is able to open all mailboxes in this container
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