Header Files

I am experienced in C and C++ but I am not veery experienced in making Header files and accesing
    them from a program,
    so I was hoping that someone could give me an example on how I could do something like that!

    Thanks

    Anton
smoothasiceAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
dschCommented:
I am quite new to C++ but I think you are referring to the header files for your functions and varibles. So I hope this will answer your question.

eg of Header file.
/*Header example
file name: headername.h */
void SOMEFUNCTION(int, char);


class SOMECLASS
{
public:
    SOMECLASS();
    ~SOMECLASS();
private:
    int AVariable;
}

eg of file that contains the program.

#include "headername.h"

SOMECLASS::SOMECLASS()
{
   AVarable = 5;
}
~SOMECLASS::SOMECLASS()
{
}
void SOMEFUNCTION(int x, char S)
{
//your code goes here
}


I hope this is what you needed. If I am wrong or if I've made some monumental mistake anybody please let me know. I am trying to get experience in answering questions.
Bye for now, dsch
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nietodCommented:
Did that answer your question?  If not can you explain what part of making header files you don't understand?  do you not know what should or should not go in?  Do you not know how to control things so the header code is not included multiple times?
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smoothasiceAuthor Commented:
nietod,
I do'nt realy understand how they link together, as in how I would make it so that main program can access the information in that header file.  That is mainly what I want to use the header file for.
if you can give me any clues as to how I could do this I would be very grateful

Anton
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nietodCommented:
how can the "main program ... access the information in that header file"?  The main program file will include the header file, using the #include pre-processor directive.  You probably use this directive to include some of the standard C++ library files.  For example to include the string library you place

#include <string.h>

near the top of your program.  However, the < ... > version is really meant to be used for header files provided with the C++ compiler.  Header files you write should be included using

#include "filename.h"

where the < and > have been replaced with quotes.  The difference between the two is in where it looks for the files.  

Note all this directive does is that it tells the compiler to include the entire contents of the specified file at that location in the file being compiled.  

Does that answer your question?  or are we still missing the mark?
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