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Win95 Peer to Peer UserProfile

Posted on 1998-08-22
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
Reading Windows Resource Kit Help File (d:(CDROM)\Admin\Reskit\helpfile) Win95 CDROM
I have seen that I can configuring My PeerToPeer Network to use Network Profiles.

The Document is in the Help Section:
- User Profiles and System Policies
- Enabling User Profiles
- Maintaining Roving User Profiles on Other Networks

The Help file say (a summary):
Create a prifile.ini file on server in appropriate directory
And set up client machine to get it. (?)

But something doesn't work.
1) Is this document correct?
2) Do I must setup client to connect to an NT Server? (doesn't work)

3) There are other way to do the same?
4) And can I get also the policies?

Thanks & Regards

Fabio
0
Comment
Question by:mariotti
15 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:djtansey
ID: 1544503
First of all..... tell me about what kind of network you are tring to set up... Is it a simple Ethernet card nework... no hub...? Hub? What kind of cards? What kind of cable? I need more specific information if i am going to help you?

David
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544504
You must put the file you intend to install into the correct directory of the server. Here are a couple of Microsft Technet articles which may help you.
-------------------------------
 
PSS ID Number: Q159254
Article last modified on 05-21-1998
 
95
 
WINDOWS
 

======================================================================
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:
 
 - Microsoft Windows 95
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
SYMPTOMS
========
 
Windows Sockets programs that use the IPX protocol in Windows 95 may not
work correctly. The program may indicate an "out of memory" error message.
 
One such program is Attachmate Extra Personal Client, which may not finish
Setup successfully or generate error messages when it lists servers. After
creating a socket, the program's Windows Sockets Bind() call fails with
WSAENOBUFS(10055).
 
CAUSE
=====
 
WSIPX calls IFSMGR to allocate memory from IFSMGR's heap. If IFSMGR is out
of heap space and the allocation request is for less than one page (4 KB),
IFSMGR does not grow the heap because it assumes this is an interrupt time
allocation.
 
RESOLUTION
==========
 
This issue is resolved by the following updated file for Windows 95, and
later versions of this file:
 
   WSIPX.VXD  version 4.0.953  dated 11/4/96  14,545 bytes
 
A version of this file that also resolves this problem is included in the
Windows Sockets 2.0 Update for Windows 95. For information about obtaining
this update, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q182108
   TITLE     : Availability of Windows Sockets 2.0 for Windows 95
 
The updated WSIPX resolves this problem by calling IFSMGR, when needed,
to explicitly grow the heap.
 
STATUS
======
 
Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in Microsoft Windows 95. An
update to address this problem is now available, but is not fully
regression tested and should be applied only to computers experiencing
this specific problem. Unless you are severely impacted by this specific
problem, Microsoft does not recommend implementing this update at this
time. Contact Microsoft Technical Support for additional information about
the availability of this update.
 
This issue is resolved in Microsoft Windows 98.
 
MORE INFORMATION
================
 
For additional information about issues resolved by updates to this
component, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge
Base:
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q171352
   TITLE     : Large Data Transfer Using WinSock Over SPX May Not Work
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q163378
   TITLE     : Microsoft Exchange Hangs Sending Message Using SPX
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q163329
   TITLE     : Fatal Exception 0E in WSIPX Using Windows Sockets
               Program
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q161179
   TITLE     : WinSock Zero-Length Packet Not Sent on Network
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q155675
   TITLE     : IPX Headers Not Returned to WinSock Program
 
For additional information about Windows 95 updates, please see the
following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q161020
   TITLE     : Implementing Windows 95 Updates
 
The third-party product discussed in this article is manufactured by
a vendor independent of Microsoft; we make no warranty, implied or
otherwise, regarding this product's performance or reliability.
 
Additional query words:
======================================================================
Keywords          : msnets win95 kberrmsg kbfixlist
Version           : 95
Platform          : WINDOWS
Issue type        : kbprb
=============================================================================
Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1998.


 
 
By Michael Meulemans
ABSTRACT: Windows 95 allows easier user and system management through User Profiles and System Policies. User Profile components include Windows 95 settings (for example, background, font selection, shortcuts), network settings (network connections and shared resources), and application settings (menu/toolbar configurations and application window configuration preferences). System Policies, which supersede any settings that may exist in User Profiles or Hardware Profiles, allow network administrators to manage and modify network policies or user configurations for all networked Windows 95 users. An annotated bibliography at the end of this article lists additional sources of information.
Introduction
Recent focus group polls conducted by TechNet indicate that help desk managers and network administrators often are justifiably skeptical about allowing users free rein to set up personal PCs on the network. Now, user management tools in Windows 95 allow network administrators to customize the look and feel of networked PCs on the basis of users preferences or their hardware. As Christine Comaford said recently in "PC Week:
"Windows 95 heeds my call for user safety nets. It will let me set up user profiles and disable portions of the Control Panel. What a feeling of power. I don't want to hear about any more helpdesk calls from users who accidentally uninstalled their printers or set all system colors to be blue and want to know what's wrong with their monitor."
System management tools are not new to Microsoft products; they have been around in various forms in Microsoft LAN Manager, Windows NT, and Windows for Workgroups. While these tools helped network managers control certain aspects of users PC environments, they were not yet sufficiently developed to allow specific and precise control of user desktops from a central location. In Windows 95, the System Policy Editor (in conjunction with the Registry Editor) has been developed as the network managers front-line resource for enabling, disabling, and customizing system capabilities. This article examines user profiles and system policies as they relate to the MIS professional, help desk manager, or network administrator.
User and System Management Issues
The Feature Specification for Windows 95 simplified setup and configuration (Plug and Play), provided an integrated and complete protect mode operating system, improved network client, peer server, and workgroup functionality, and established a robust, mobile, computing environment.
Later beta site studies showed that users understood and appreciated these design elements. In addition, testers were surprised to see high marks also for the improved control that Windows 95 gives MIS managers over their users desktops.
Diagnosing Configuration Problems the Old Fashioned Way
CONFIG.SYS, AUTOEXEC.BAT, WIN.INI, and SYSTEM.INIartifacts of Windows 3.1 we all would like to forget. However, you know the support song and dance, so lets reflect on configuration management done the old fashioned way:
7      Path statements resembling novellas
7      Information scattered in all locations WINFILE.INI, PROTOCOL.INI, SYSTEM.INI, MSMAIL.INI, private .INI files, private .GRP files
7      Text-based .INI files limited to 64 KB and APIs that allowed only for get/write operations
7      Several hundred different switches and entries, which practically required a Computer Science degree to configure
7      .INI files that couldnt store user-specific information thereby making multiple user access to computers difficult
7      .INI files made local to each system, sans API mechanisms to enable remote administration
 
The days of tweaking .INI files came to an end with Windows NT and the concept of a Registry. Windows NTs configuration utility, the Registry Editor (REGEDT32.EXE), used in conjunction with the Windows NT Diagnostics tool (WINMSD.EXE) allowed experienced users the ability to view or edit configuration information stored in the Registry. The Registry made systems easier to manage by acting as a single repository of seemingly random configuration information: computer hardware the system used, system software, and the systems users profiles. Furthermore, the Registry alleviated configuration management and support woes by allowing secure, remote access to user- and system-specific information on networked systems.
Windows 95 Registry
The Windows 95 Registry falls somewhere between Windows 3.1s Registration Database, which stores file associations and OLE registration information, and Windows NTs Registry, which stores hardware settings and installed software information, allows other applications to store configuration data, and completely does away with the plain text files that Windows 3.1 uses.
As comprehensive as Windows NTs Registry, the Windows 95 Registry still processes CONFIG.SYS, AUTOEXEC.BAT, and WIN.INI. Why? Primarily because Win16-based applications expect to find and manipulate the WIN.INI and SYSTEM.INI files to add entries or load unique device drivers.
Besides solving the proliferation and system-wide distribution of .INI files, the Windows 95 Registry simplifies setting system switches, plays a pivotal role in Plug and Play implementation, and, because many of the Win32 Registry APIs use the remote procedure call (RPC), allows remote access to Registry information. In addition to helping placate MIS managers, network querying of information with RPCs enables the custom development of industry PC management mechanisms like Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and Desktop Management Interface (DMI).
User Profiles and the Windows 95 Registry
The Windows 95 Registry is a hierarchically-structured data store of system, user, and policy information organized into two .DAT files: SYSTEM.DAT (PC-specific information) and USER.DAT (user-specific information). When you establish network, hardware, and security parameters, the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE portion of the Registry is updated and it in turn updates SYSTEM.DAT. When you establish desktop settings, such as application preferences, screen colors, and security access permissions, the HKEY_CURRENT_USER portion of the Registry is updated and it in turn updates USER.DAT.
When user profiles are enabled, Windows 95 creates a folder for each user in the Windows Profiles directory. Each user profile folder contains a USER.DAT file, a backup profile file, a Desktop folder, a Recent folder, and a Start Menu folder. Windows 95 subsequently creates a separate user profile for each user who logs onto the computer. All of this is performed painlessly by Windows 95 and requires no additional modification or setup; user profiles need only be enabled once.
 
Note   Because of the Registrys complexity and its central role in the Windows 95 desktop system, it is recommended that changes and settings be established by experienced network managers or help desk staff.
 
SYSTEM.DAT and USER.DAT Location
You can use the Registry Editor locally or remotely (Figure 1) to read and write values contained in the Registry's User Profile and Hardware Profile. If you want to manage a user or workgroups PC environment remotely, you can move USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT to a server. This also makes it possible to run Windows 95 on a diskless or remote initial program load (RIPL) workstation.
Figure 1:  Windows 95s Registry Editor
You can also put SYSTEM.DAT on the PCs local drive and USER.DAT in the users logon directory on a network server. Remember that if you want to make user profiles available on the network you must ensure that a network home directory exists for each user. This enables users to maintain their network connections and desktop configurations from wherever they log on to the network. In both this case and the first case a copy of USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT remain locally in the Windows 95 Profiles folder of the computer. Also, Windows 95 automatically synchronizes both user profile copies each time users log on and off the system.
Finally, you can put the Registry and all other system files on a local hard disk to allow multiple users, with unique logon usernames and user profiles, to share a single Windows 95 PC.
User Profile Settings and Benefits
Enabling user profiles through the Passwords option in Windows 95s Control Panel lets you establish:
7      A custom background, desktop layout, and display resolution
7      Network connections, preferred server, and shared resources
7      Menu, toolbar, and window configuration preferences
 
When you enable user profiles you click the option Users Can Customize Their Preferences And Desktop Settings in the User Profiles tab. To describe what ought be included in the user profile you check or clear two User Profile Setting options:
7      Include desktop icons and Network Neighborhood
7      Include Start menu and program groups
 
The first option determines whether desktop shortcuts and the Network Neighborhood are included in the user profile; the second, whether custom settings for the Start menu and the related program groups are included. If you check these boxes, your desktop directory and Start menu will follow you around a network when you logon to different computers. These check boxes modify the SYSTEM.DAT file of the user profile.
If user profile files are established on a network, users can log in from anywhere in the network on any Windows 95 user profile-enabled PC, and bring up their custom-tailored, pre-established desktop environment. The username and logon password trigger Windows 95 to automatically reconfigure the desktop. If specified in the USER.DAT file, Windows 95 also establishes previously-stored network and print resources, and implements directory sharing capabilities on the Windows 95 machine.
For more information on setting up user profiles on Windows NT and NetWare networks, check out two sections in Chapter 15 of the Windows 95 Resource Kit: "Setting Up User Profiles on a Windows NT Network" and "Setting Up User Profiles on a NetWare Network."
The benefits of using user profiles are obvious:
7      Users on the move, like support specialists, help desk managers, or corporate technicians can log onto the network from any Windows 95 32-bit, protected-mode client, and feel right at home on any PC. There is no need to establish new connections to corporate support servers or regain access to normally restricted applications.
7      User profile maintenance is painless. If the User Profile option is enabled, changes to a users USER.DAT file are maintained automatically whether the user profile is stored locally or remotely.
7      Users who habitually map network directories to the wrong letter, change the 3-D corporate logo background, or forget specific print shares will no longer be support nightmares.
 
Mandatory User Profiles
You can force users to use specific settings by creating a mandatory user profile, a USER.MAN file, placing it in the users network directory, hiding the file, and making it read-only. (On a Windows NT network, the network directory is the users home directory; on a NetWare network, its the users mail directory.) When located to the server, USER.MAN settings are downloaded to the users Registry at logon rather than USER.DAT file settings. Network administrators have the option to enable user override capabilities.
System Policies: Crowd Control Barriers for Novice Users
PC Computing editor Matthew Lake suggested that system policies are like:
...crowd control barriers that keep individual users from wandering off the main road into tech-support wilderness.
System Policies give network administrators comprehensive control over users Windows 95 PCs. System Policy settings are established in a CONFIG.POL file that is located on a logon server, not a local computer. Settings established in the CONFIG.POL file are maintained on a network server and then copied to a users local Registry on logon, overwriting settings contained in the USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT Registry sections.
 
Note   Both Windows NT and NetWare networks are supported as network servers; however, consult the section "Preparing to Use System Policies on the Network" in the Windows 95 Resource Kit for information on support for automatic and manual downloading of these files.
 
To understand system policies its important to realize how they differ from mandatory user profiles (USER.MAN):
7      System policies are much more comprehensive than mandatory user profiles in that they allow an administrator to mandate both user-specific and computer-specific settings; mandatory user profiles control all user-specific settings only.
7      System policies are much more flexible to use because they allow an administrator to establish a subset of user settings to control and allow the user to control the remaining settings. Mandatory user profiles control every user-specific setting.
 
Both system policies and mandatory user profiles are ways to mandate user settings. A network administrator may choose to employ both methods. See the Appropriate System Policy and Mandatory User Profile Use in Windows 95 section of this article to understand when to use either or both methods.
Using the System Policy Editor (POLEDIT.EXE) an administrator can seamlessly set a users system policies through an intuitive GUI (Figure 2). The editor is located on the Windows 95 compact disc in the \ADMIN\APPTOOLS\POLEDIT directory.
Figure 2:  Windows 95s System Policy Editor
The target computer must have user profiles enabled to use system policies and for settings to be established. Take a look at the following system policy settings overview to understand the set of policy options available in Windows 95. These are just some of the system policy settings.
Sample User-Specific Restrictions
 
Option      Examples

Restrict access to control panels      Hide the Display Control Panel, Network Control Panel, and Passwords Control Panel
Restrict printer settings      Disable deletion of printers and hide the General and Details property sheets for the printer
Define desktop settings      Wall paper and color scheme are predefined
Restrict access to network settings      Disable file and print sharing
Restrict access to shell settings      Hide Start menu subfolders and custom Start menu, remove Run and Find commands, disable Shut Down command, and hide Network Neighborhood
Restrict access to system settings      Disable Registry editing tools, only run allowed Windows applications, and disable MS-DOS prompt
Sample Computer-Specific restrictions
 
Option      Examples

Enable user-level security      User-level access control through pass-through validation by a Windows NT or NetWare server
Establish custom logon banner      Type values for a caption and text displayed in a logon banner
Microsoft client for Windows networks      Enable participation in Windows NT domain or workgroup
Password settings      Disable password caching and require alphanumeric Windows password
Dial-up Networking      Disable dial-in connections to the computer
Sharing      Disable file and print sharing
The Enable User Profiles option is especially useful. It allows you to set user profiles on a number of networked Windows 95 PCs without going to each PC individually by creating a system policy that can be downloaded automatically when the initial Windows 95 installation is completea huge time-saver. Check out the Windows 95 Resource Kit for a complete list of system policy options.
Appropriate System Policy and Mandatory User Profile Use in Windows 95
To understand when to use mandatory user profiles, system policies, or both, well examine a number of scenarios.
A configuration in which you want to impose restrictions on many similar nodes is one in which system policies are appropriate. Suppose youre the network administrator of a university with 25,000 student nodes. Maintaining a single, global CONFIG.POL file to enforce network-wide system or user restrictions would make sense. Unlike user profiles, system policy restrictions make available such facilities as removing the Run command from the Start menu, which prohibits users from running applications using the Run command in the Start menu, and Hide All, which prevents users from making any changes to Control Panel or Printer settings. In such a scenario, you could create one policy file for each group of users, even if some of the client computers in the group didnt have group policy support enabled. When creating system policies for groups of individuals, you must ensure that GROUPPOL.DLL, which supports group policies, has been successfully installed on each client computer. See the Creating Policies for Groups section in Chapter 15 of the Windows 95 Resource Kit, for further information.
System policies make it easier to maintain an extremely secure, customized, enterprise-wide environment from one central location. For example, five Add Custom options available in system policies (Add Custom Desktop Icons, Add Custom Programs Folder, Add Custom Startup Folder, Add Custom Network Neighborhood, and Add Custom Start Menu) offer administrators an opportunity for customization by defining a program group containing corporate applications, applications that run at system startup, a custom Network Neighborhood, or a custom Start menu with standard choices. The system policy restrictions Disable File and Printer Sharing, Disable Registry Editing tools, and Disable Dial-up Networking are standard safety precautions for most corporate environments unavailable in maintaining just a mandatory user profile.
Mandatory user profiles provide certain functionality that is difficult to establish when using system policies. For example, it is much easier to configure and store Win32 application options like Tool Tips, default formatting options, or other menu options with mandatory user profiles. Using system policies typically means working from a default template, ADMIN.ADM. Unless you custom design your own .ADM template, you are restricted to the default templates functionality. Other Registry keys such as disabling the Online Registration option or the Welcome Screen are much easier to control with mandatory user profiles.
 
Note   For some specific settings you would have to use Registry Editor against a current USER.DAT, then save the configuration to USER.MAN.
 
Because you can modify every aspect of a users desktop with a mandatory user profile, whereas you can only modify a subset of USER.DAT contents with system policies, training or guest accounts might be uses for USER.MAN.
Using both methods helps to address the limitations of implementing one by itself. For example, you could use a CONFIG.POL file together with a USER.MAN to disable the Registry editing tools and change dial-in server support in conjunction with configuring a Win32 applications environment options. Both policies and profiles are designed to be used together so that system managers can deal with special cases and needs.
A thorough needs analysis prior to implementation will help you decide whether to use one method or both. If you decide to use only one method, figure out which involves the least customization to satisfy your needs. Authoring .ADM files or tweaking .INFs can be risky business, even for an experienced Windows 95 user.
Another important limitation to consider is that the System Policy Editor is only available on the compact disc version of Windows 95 and not on the floppy diskette version. Administrators who purchase the floppy version for their site will not obtain other administration tools or help files.
The next section outlines some questions you may want to ask yourself before implementing either of these methods.
Before You Implement User Profiles and System Policies
Now, before you start mandating that all your networked users use MYDOGSPIKE.BMP as a default system background you might want to consider the following issues.
If youre thinking about implementing user profiles:
7      What user-specific or system-specific settings do you need to maintain a secure, supportable PC environment? You dont want users thinking youre Big Brother.
7      Do you want to use system policies for user settings instead of mandatory user profiles? Remember, to use system policies, user profiles must be enabled on the computer. Also consider the scope of control and customization youre looking for.
7      Are traveling users an important reason for user profile implementation? Besides having 32-bit, protected mode network clients, each roving user must have a home directory on the network where user profile files, like USER.DAT, are kept.
7      If you choose to use user profiles, establish whether mandatory user profiles are necessary. A mandatory user profile requires an administrator to copy the necessary files to each users network directory.
 
If system policies are more appropriate for your network configuration, consider these issues:
7      What types of restrictions are necessary to enforce? Will you jeopardize user productivity by limiting certain options? Limiting access to the MS-DOS prompt will prevent command line file tampering; however, it might also force unnecessary help desk calls because a user doesnt have the ability to perform a basic support operation.
7      What type of network architecture will you be using? How many servers are in use? How many users are supported? What is the typical logon process? Will you be assigning application availability on the basis of a users membership in a specific company team: marketing, accounting, system support personnel, or administration? Uniform logon procedures for groups of users in addition to users sharing one computer will also impact decisions concerning system and user customization.
7      Do Windows 95 system policies meet your administration needs? For higher levels of administration, consider using Microsoft Systems Management Server.
 
Templates
After asking yourself these questions you might want to investigate some system policy templates. The System Policy Editor opens a default policy template on startup. Creating custom templates is helpful because they list only specific policies an administrator ought to consider restricting or setting for a given environment. For example, if you were the lead network administrator in your company you could develop three or four template examples for administrators below you to set. These second-level administrators would not have to worry about what parameters to restrict or set, only what degree of restriction or access was necessary. For a detailed example of a Maximum- and a Minimum-Level System Policy template, see the online examples provided with the Windows 95 Resource Kit utilities.
Conclusion
Used responsibly and in conjunction with a logical support and systems management plan, user profiles and system policies offer an effective means to minimizing help desk calls and managing PCs throughout a Windows 95 network.
 
Note   Microsoft doesnt support changes made to the Windows 95 Registry.
 
More Information
You can read the following documents for more information on the Windows 95 Registry, user profiles, and system policies.
On TechNet
The following resources are all available on TechNet Disc 1.
 
Document      Location

Windows NT 3.5 Resource Kit      MS BackOffice and Enterprise Systems; MS Windows NT Workstation; Resource Kit Version 3.5
Windows 95 Resource Kit      Personal Systems; MS Windows 95; Resource Kit
Various Knowledge Base articles      Microsoft Knowledge Base
Elsewhere
 
Document      Location

Microsoft Windows NT Server System Guide      Not on the TechNet CD. Ships with the product.
Introducing Microsoft Windows 95: The Next Generation of Microsoft Windows      Microsoft Press: ISBN 1-55615-860-2
Inside Windows 95      Microsoft Press: ISBN 1-55615-626-X
Inside Windows NT      Microsoft Press: ISBN 1-55615-481-X
Windows 95: for Deadheads and Suits      Lake, Matthew, PC-Computing, Dec. 1994, volume 7, number 12, p62(1)
Microsoft, Keep Out!      Raskin, Robin, PC Magazine, June 13, 1995, volume 14, number 11, p30(1)
Managing Win95 Over a Net      Harper, Eric, LAN TIMES, April 24, 1995, volume 12, number 8, p126(1)
Its Better Not to Judge a New OS by its Cover      Comaford, Christine, PCWeek, April 24, 1995, volume 12, number 16, p22(1)
A Good Product Just Got Better      Luoma-Hopson, Casey, Data Based Advisor, Feb. 1995, volume 13, number 2, p26(2)
How to Ride the Win95 Marketing Wave      Davis, Dwight B., Windows Watcher, Feb. 1995, volume 5, number 2, p1(1)
Windows 95 Tool Gives Administrators Control      Harper, Eric, LAN TIMES, May 8, 1995, volume 12, number 9, p103(2)
Win 95 Scripts      Watterson, Karen, Windows Sources, April 1995, volume 3, number 4, p161(3)
Windows 95: A Distributed Computing Platform      Goulde, Michael A., Distributed Computing Monitor, June 1995, volume 10, number 3, p34(6)
Microsoft TechNet
September 1995
Volume 3, Issue 9


 
 
PSS ID Number: Q138046
Article last modified on 05-13-1998
 
95 98
 
WINDOWS
 

======================================================================
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:
 
 - Microsoft Windows 95
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
SYMPTOMS
========
 
You may be unable to save user profiles to a Microsoft Windows NT server.
 
CAUSE
=====
 
This problem can occur if the following conditions exist:
 
 - The Primary Network Login setting is not set to Client For Microsoft
   Networks.
 
 - User profiles are not enabled.
 
 - A Home directory is not set up correctly for the user on the domain.
 
RESOLUTION
==========
 
To resolve the problem, follow these steps:
 
1. Set the Primary Network Login setting to Client For Microsoft Networks.
 
2. Enable user profiles.
 
3. Set up a Home directory on the Windows NT server. To verify that the
   Home directory is set up correctly, type the following line at an
   MS-DOS prompt
 
      net use <x>: /home
 
   where <x> is a drive letter.
 
   If you receive an error message stating "The syntax is incorrect,"
   Home directories are not set up correctly.
 
   For additional information about setting up Home directories, please
   see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
 
      ARTICLE-ID: Q137979
      TITLE     : Creating Windows 95 Home Directories on Windows NT
                  Server
 
Additional query words: 95 98
======================================================================
Keywords          : kbnetwork msnds win95
Version           : 95 98
Platform          : WINDOWS
Issue type        : kbprb
=============================================================================
Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1998.


 

0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544505
My Directories on the server are:
name                                      net name         comment
c:\condivisioni\homedirs        homedirs          Home profile dir
c:\condivisioni\profiles           profiles             Contain profiles.ini
c:\condivisioni\homedirs\test   -------               home of user test

0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544506
The files you intend to use should be in the export directory. Did you read any of the above Technet articles?  I will give you the exact location in another comment if you are not familiar with the export directory.
0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544507
TO Joe_massimo:

I am not familiar with export directory.
Where I can find the names of registry keys that windows95
use to find user profiles in the network?
I know how windows95 search local profile but I can't
change this on every PC.
thanks again

0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544508
Did you read any of the TechNet stuff I posted above?  Here is a very small part of it.   The information is there

------------------
The Windows 95 Registry is a hierarchically-structured data store of system, user, and policy information organized into two .DAT files: SYSTEM.DAT (PC-specific information) and USER.DAT (user-specific information). When you establish network, hardware, and security parameters, the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE portion of the Registry is updated and it in turn updates SYSTEM.DAT. When you establish desktop settings, such as application preferences, screen colors, and security access permissions, the HKEY_CURRENT_USER portion of the Registry is updated and it in turn updates USER.DAT.
When user profiles are enabled, Windows 95 creates a folder for each user in the Windows Profiles directory. Each user profile folder contains a USER.DAT file, a backup profile file, a Desktop folder, a Recent folder, and a Start Menu folder. Windows 95 subsequently creates a separate user profile for each user who logs onto the computer. All of this is performed painlessly by Windows 95 and requires no additional modification or setup; user profiles need only be enabled once.
   
Note   Because of the Registry’s complexity and its central role in the Windows 95 desktop system, it is recommended that changes and settings be established by experienced network managers or help desk staff.
   
SYSTEM.DAT and USER.DAT Location
You can use the Registry Editor locally or remotely (Figure 1) to read and write values contained in the Registry's User Profile and Hardware Profile. If you want to manage a user or workgroup’s PC environment remotely, you can move USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT to a server. This also makes it possible to run Windows 95 on a diskless or remote initial program load (RIPL) workstation.
Figure 1:  Windows 95’s Registry Editor
You can also put SYSTEM.DAT on the PC’s local drive and USER.DAT in the user’s logon directory on a network server. Remember that if you want to make user profiles available on the network you must ensure that a network home directory exists for each user. This enables users to maintain their network connections and desktop configurations from wherever they log on to the network. In both this case and the first case a copy of USER.DAT and SYSTEM.DAT remain locally in the Windows 95 Profiles folder of the computer. Also, Windows 95 automatically synchronizes both user profile copies each time users log on and off the system.
Finally, you can put the Registry and all other system files on a local hard disk to allow multiple users, with unique logon usernames and user profiles, to share a single Windows 95 PC.
User Profile Settings and Benefits
Enabling user profiles through the Passwords option in Windows 95’s Control Panel lets you establish:
· A custom background, desktop layout, and display resolution
· Network connections, preferred server, and shared resources
· Menu, toolbar, and window configuration preferences
   
When you enable user profiles you click the option Users Can Customize Their Preferences And Desktop Settings in the User Profiles tab. To describe what ought be included in the user profile you check or clear two User Profile Setting options:
· Include desktop icons and Network Neighborhood
· Include Start menu and program groups
   
0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544509
oopppsss!!

I know everything above!! ....
The problem is still here!!

Win95 reads for local profile the registry in:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE_SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\
CurrentVersion\ProfilesList

Now if I need to get Profiles from the network which key I must look for?

The problem is where is storedthe name of network user home directory!

I have sets the c:\condivision\homedirs as \\server\homedirs
and the c:\condivisioni\profiles as \\server\profiles

and I have added the SharedProfileList kayword in the registry

But it still does't work!

so! must the network directory have an other name?
Where I can test which directory Win95 is looking for?

In your answer there is:
 Remember that if you want to make user profiles available on the network you must ensure that a network home directory exists for each user

But where?

One more note: I am sorry for my english :) I am Italian.

thanks
0
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544510
Here we go again. If I could print this in Italian I would.

 
PSS ID Number: Q137979
Article last modified on 05-08-1997
 
3.50 3.51 95
 
WINDOWS
 

======================================================================
3.50 3.51 95
WINDOWS
kbinterop
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:
 
 - Microsoft Windows NT Server versions 3.5 and 3.51
 - Microsoft Windows 95
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
SYMPTOM
=======
 
Your Windows 95 clients cannot connect to their home directories even
though you create a profile in Windows NT User Manager that specifies the
Windows 95 users' home directory and drive letter to use for the
connection.
 
CAUSE
=====
 
Windows NT is not properly configured or your script is incorrect.
 
RESOLUTION
==========
 
To allow Windows 95 users to connect to their home directories on the
server, create a logon script to connect a Windows 95 client to a home
directory and configure your Windows NT Primary Domain Controller (PDC) as
follows:
 
 1. Create a test logon script on the Windows NT PDC for Windows 95 client
    workstations:
 
       echo on
       net use * /HOME
       pause
 
 2. Place the script file in the SYSTEM32\REPL\IMPORT\SCRIPTS directory
    on the Windows NT PDC. (You may also want to set up File Replication so
    the logon scripts you create are available on all domain controllers.)
 
 3. Make sure that the test user logging on has Full control of the
    \SCRIPTS directory and at least Read permission on the Netlogon share
    (the default share of \WINNT35\SYSTEM32\REPL\IMPORT\SCRIPTS).
 
 4. Create a subdirectory called TEST in the shared Users directory.
    By default the shared Users directory is C:\USERS.
 
 5. Share the Test subdirectory with the share name TEST and give the test
    user 'Full Control' permission to the share. 6. Run User Manager for
    Domains and select the user for the test.
 
 6. From the User menu, choose Properties.
 
 7. Choose Profile in the User Properties dialog box.
 
 8. Type the test logon script name in the Logon Script Name field.
 
 9. Under Home Directory, in the To field type:
 
       \\<server_name>\TEST
 
    NOTE: Ignore the drive letter in the Connect field.
 
10. Log on as the test user at the Windows 95 client.
 
    The following text appears at the command prompt:
 
       c:\win95>echo on
       c:\win95>net use * /home
       d: connected to \\<servername>\TEST
       c:\win95> pause
       Press any key to continue. . .
 
11. On the Windows 95 client, press any key to continue. Then doubleclick
    the My Computer icon.
 
    NOTE: In My Computer, the home directory maps to D: (or the next
    available drive letter on the client).
 
12. If the logon script executes correctly, you may delete the Echo On and
    Pause lines from your script resulting in your script consisting of
    only the following line:
 
       net use * /HOME
 
    NOTE: You may specify a drive letter in place of the Next Available
    Drive symbol, the star (*). You may also rename the Users\Test
    directory to any name; be sure to make the corresponding changes
    wherever this new directory name is used.
 
MORE INFORMATION
================
 
Using NET USE * /HOME from Multiple MS-DOS Command Prompts
----------------------------------------------------------
 
If you use the NET USE * /HOME command from more than one MS-DOS command
prompt in Windows 95, your current directory is going to be set
incorrectly. Your current directory is going to be the root of the server
containing your home directory instead of your default home directory.
 
KBCategory: kbinterop
KBSubcategory: ntconfig
Additional reference words: prodnt 3.50 3.51 win95 win95x winnt
======================================================================
Keywords            : ntconfig kbinterop
Version             : 3.50 3.51 95
Platform            : WINDOWS
=============================================================================
Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1997.


 

0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544511
Dear joe_massimino,

have you read the document I had proposed at first question?
That document is about to set up user profile on OTHER network
and explain how to set up user profiles for a network that doesn't have WinNT!
And more..... this document explain how I can setup user profiles using Win95 PC as Server!

You can found that document in every (or maybe OSR1) releise of Win95!

I need to setup user profiles using ONLY win95 I do not have WinNT!
as explained in THAT document!

But now from your last document I have understood that there is maybe a way!
If I try to configure all the PCs to read users home dirs from a drive named for example H:
and directory named home (a network shared directory) I can get the same result!

Please, we are at the end, if you think that this is the only way I will accept your answer
and also if you can give me a bit more help undertanding that document or what's wrong!
But please read that document.

In my Win95 CDs (Italian version) it is here:
D:(CDROM)\Admin\Reskit\helpfile
There is there a big .HLP file I don't remember the name now!

and have a look to this section:

- User Profiles and System Policies
- Enabling User Profiles
- Maintaining Roving User Profiles on Other Networks

I do not only will accept your answer but I will be gratefull!

thanks
& regards

       fabio
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544512
Have you tried using the policy editor?  Having only Win95 does not offer you a lot of control over your network and users. adding an NT server adds a certain amount of control, and adding all NT machines offers total control. You may be able to change policy on a Win95 PC, but you can't force the issue if the user wants to take control back. How many Win95 Pc's are their for you to work with?  Did you know that you can get an administration install disk which will let you customise the Win95 installation to your own wishes? I don't use it on Win95 installs, but I do use it on Outlook.  Microsoft sold me the disk I use on Outlook for $15.
0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544513
OK!

Joe_massimino.

I am managing a little network. 12 PCs Working with Office97 or better Word97/8.0.
I had manage all the work doing it on my part-time!

I am going to set up for them an Itranet! I have done a lot of work with Sambar Server
thinking about to have a portable system. Address, appointment and so on are now on Intranet. I am going to leave them for scientic porpores! .....

This society, where I am working is too yong too pay a system administrator and I do not want to leave them with WinNT and a system adminstrator! I must leave all the job to somebody and I want to try to give him less work that is possible!

Now I know howw the society is working and I can manage a good job for them, but,
going to leave them, I don't want to give to the next System administrator too unuseful work! I have alredy shared OutLook for example but I would like to share profiles!

The system I have setup is quiet depeendent on my past work! They are doing a lot of things as thay are using a good network system! but they do not have sch system!

Now if I can set-up user profiles and I can give some infos to the next guy I have done a good job!

Policies editor work on NT machines! in the way that I can set up polcieis on every PCs but I must do that on every PCs. I have not a lot of PCs but it is easier to give to the next guy few infos than a lot of details about every PCs.

So ..... back to my document. Do you think that the infos there are true?
I have already checked my work, more than one time!
do I go to miss something else?

In that document and other there, ther are no descriptions about policies (om Win95 network), but as I have asked before I would llike to set up that! I know that maybe
it is not possible with only Win95 PCs but the idea to setup profiles is quite enought!

I want to say again. I am working on a little network and little office and I cann't tell to them to get WinNT beacouse it will need an adminstrator. Now thay can work on everything just with few concepts and I do not think it is a good idea to give them one more people working there just for WinNT. Thay have FAX shared document, protect documents, shared address book and so on....
Why do I need to buy WinNT when, in this situation, I can do all the needed works?
I know that in the future with maybe just one more PC my network will ned a server/cllient administration but now with my few resorces I would like to address my porpores!

thanks again
fabio

PS:
If you thing that my previoous idea was goog please let me know!

regards
fabio


0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544514
Is the Samba Server? running on Linux?  Or maybe that was Sambar and I just don't know what that is.


0
 

Author Comment

by:mariotti
ID: 1544515
Sambar is an free HTTP server (www.sambar.com), running
on Win95/NT machines. It is a quite good sever being free.
I have tryed also OmniHTTPD and one other more but Sambar
seems to be the better choice.

and using it with SSI and perl, I have a "good Intranet" with
at 0 money! OK just a bit of work to setup the system...

I have also samba on linux! .. but the linux machine
now is just the firewall and gateway machine. ie Internet to 192.168.xxx.xxx.

Now I can use Policy Editor on Win95 to setup Policies but I
must do this on every PC. I hope in few days to get policies
from a Win95 server ... but I am still looking for User Profiles.

soon
fabio
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:joe_massimino
ID: 1544516
Fabio, I am not finding any way to set profiles on Win95 clients without configuring each one first. I am stil researching.
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
simonlam earned 210 total points
ID: 1544517
pls take note that win95 can share policy, user profile and mandatory files when they are located on C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32\REPL\IMPORT\SCRIPTS directory of an NT server only.

peer-to-peer environment doesn't cater for this option.  the win95 resource kit has clearly indicated this option.

that is also a reason why our company eventually change the workgroup into a client-server environment to give better control.

an alternative to this is to create a standard CONFIG.POL and copy it into C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM of each win95 machine.  user can delete it of course.

cheers
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