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How do you determine DIRECTORY size?

Posted on 1998-08-25
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Last Modified: 2008-03-04
My question is this:  How can I determine the size of a Directory?  Is there a simple function similar to Filelen(filepath)?  I don't want to scroll through all the files of a directory and add up all the filesizes.

Thanks!
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Question by:ksm
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4 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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tuvi earned 200 total points
ID: 1960257
Sorry, there is no such function. Even the Windows API don't have it. You have to do the FileSearch which returns the total number of files then do the loop and add the size up. It's not much code at all.
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Author Comment

by:ksm
ID: 1960258
Can you give me an example of the filesearch routine?
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Expert Comment

by:tuvi
ID: 1960259
Dim fCount As Long
Dim lngSize As Long

lngSize = 0
With Application.FileSearch
  .FileName = "*.*"
  .LookIn = "C:\" ' or whatever directory
  .SearchSubFolders = True including sub-folders
  If .Execute > 0 Then
    For fCount = 1 To .FoundFiles.Count  
      lngSize = lngSize + FileLen(.FoundFiles(fCount))
    Next fCount
  End If
End With

' lngSize is the size of your directory in bytes
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Author Comment

by:ksm
ID: 1960260
Excellent.  Thanks.
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