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simple data type conversion

Posted on 1998-08-31
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10
I have an int or a long whose value I want to check via a messagebox, but I need to convert it into a data type that the messagebox will display. How is it converted?
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Question by:jtm082698
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:kellyjj
ID: 1171707
you could type cast it.

int x=65;
char a;

a= (char ) x;
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billcav earned 20 total points
ID: 1171708
Look in your help for itoa() or ltoa(), which convert intTOascii and longTOascii respectively.

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by:nietod
ID: 1171709
itoa() etc are microsoft specifc functions.  If you want to use a more portable function (of course you are working in windows so portability is not a big issue) you can use sprintf()  That is a standard function that is available in all C++ implimentations.
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Expert Comment

by:billcav
ID: 1171710
When did Xtoa() become Microsoft-specific? I've used them in *NIX programs for more than half a decade. They reside in stdlib.


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by:nietod
ID: 1171711
microsoft specific might have been pushig it a little.  They are not part of the C++ standard so some implimentations will not support them.  But obviously some do other than microsoft.
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Expert Comment

by:billcav
ID: 1171712
Didn't they become part of the ANSII C standard four or five years back? I think the official implementation was as macros. IIRC, the C++ proposed standard has been built on the C standard, so it should include the xtoa() and atox() functions/macros.

BTW, the reason to use them instead of sprintf() is probably moot. With the current state of optimizers and the current speed of processors and size of hard drives and memory the TINY performance/code size benefit is probably not worth thinking about.


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by:nietod
ID: 1171713
According to the Microsoft docs they are not standard and it is a well know fact that Microsoft is never wrong.  : - )  The argument is moot from both sides, since this is a windows application, portability can't be that big an issue anyways.
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