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Linux, WinNT, Win95 Partitioning question

Posted on 1998-09-18
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hello there, I just bought a 1.2 gig hard drive to supplement my 1 gig hard drive.  I plan on installing Linux, WinNT and Windows 95 on the hard drive and use my current HD as a slave drive.  What would probably be the best way to partition  the drive so that the three OSes can coexist?.  Specifically, about what size should each partition be?.  I plan on having seperate partitions for the OS and for the data in each case, if you were wondering.
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Question by:MrYotsuya
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rbr earned 150 total points
ID: 1630816
It depends what programms you need in these 3 OSs, but I would say 2.2 GB would be very low HD space for all these 3 OSs. I use Windows 95 and Linux on a 2 GB HD and free space is very hard to find. Try this partitions.

Primary partition first HD 300MB for Windows95
Two extended partions first HD  400 MB for Windows NT, 300 MB for Linux.
On the second HD you store your data Use
Primary 350MB for Windows 95
Two extended 350MB for Windows NT and Linux
The rest (100-150MB) for Linux swap.
 
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by:MrYotsuya
ID: 1630817
Thanks for your prompt reply.  As soon as my Linux CD comes in, I'll try that.
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