• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 316
  • Last Modified:

Overclocking

i have a ibm 200 6x86 running on a tx pro motherboard is it possible to overclock it?
i have no manuals for the motherboard but can see the cpu voltage jumpers, is there any other jumpers to change?
0
113
Asked:
113
1 Solution
 
semontgomeryCommented:
What is the exact model of IBM (XXXX-XXX) or if you replaced your motherboard, the model of board and chip manufacturer?
0
 
semontgomeryCommented:
What is the exact model of IBM (XXXX-XXX) or if you replaced your motherboard, the model of board and chip manufacturer?
0
 
LaphroaigCommented:
DONT change any CPU core voltage jumpers. The jumpers that concern you relate to the Bus Speed and the CPU speed. The CPU speed will always be a number that is divisible by the Bus speed from X2 to X4.

Refer to this Web Page http://www.x86.org/  which can provide you with the technical spec for your board and the jumper settings. If you can't get the info of the above web site, then email me at grahamwood@clara.co.uk  and I will download and send on the info to you.
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
MorFFCommented:
Have a look here;

http://www.tomshardware.com/overclock.html

This contains everything you need to know about overclocking.  Including why you shouldn't!

Cheers - MorFF
0
 
hfvikingCommented:
You will probably have a hard time overclocking this processor
successfully. I tried with mine without much luck. The 6x86 runs optimally at 2x75.  Your TX board probably does not support a 75mhz bus (most don't, especially older ones), so I would imagine it is set to 3x66.  If there IS a setting for 75mhz, verify it is set to 2x75 (2x75 is much better than 3x66). With the 6x86, heat is a big factor. While it may be possible to jumper it to 3.5x66 (233mhz), your system will probably run too hot and you will experience frequent lockups (if it even boots at all). The amount of extra heat generated could permanently damage your processor. To find the jumper settings for your board, identify the manufacturer and check for a website. If there is no manufacturer name on the board, look at some of the more popular sites (www.asus.com, www.pcchips.com, www.giga-byte.com) to see if you can visually identify your motherboard.

0
 
113Author Commented:
Adjusted points to 90
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now