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Hard disk partitioning

Posted on 1998-09-24
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Last Modified: 2010-04-22
I am thinking of installing Linux onto a 2.5 GB hard disk.  Linux will have the whole of this disk because Windows will be on another 4.3 GB disk.  I would like to know whether I should partition the Linux disk.  If, for example, I created a partition for /, one for /usr and one for /home, will this limit my flexibility in the future.  For example if the / partition gets full and I need more space would I have to completely reformat the whole disk.  The way I see it, it would be more flexible if the disk wasn't partitioned but I have read somewhere that partitioning is recommened.  Does partitioning make sense?

Also, I would like to be able to share files between my Windows installation and my Linux installation.  What is the best way to do this.  Does it make sense to create a Windows partition and mount this in Linux (e.g. as /home/windows) and then use this as a working directory in both Windows and Linux.

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:bsufs
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ramindur earned 100 total points
ID: 1638129
You don't need to have seperate partitions for linux /, /usr/ and /home. You could use just one partition. When one of the partitions gets full, you could back it up, stick another hard disk or bigger partition, and restore it on the new partition.
As regards sharing files with Windows, you should be able to mount as per last comment.   I know that FAT-16 is mountable within linux. I believe that FAT-32 is also mountable, but I am not sure...but worth checking as that is Win95's default.
I always thought, but I could be wrong, that partitioning made sense as some OS could'nt handle very large partitions and if you screw up one partition, hopefully the data on other partitions are protected.
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