sp_addextendedproc usage

While using SQL Trace on an application, I noticed the following code:
sp_cursorfetch 95226679,2,0,1

sp_cursorfetch is defined as follows:
exec sp_addextendedproc 'sp_cursorfetch','(server internal)'

Could someone explain what is happening here?
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martyn_bannisterConnect With a Mentor Commented:

sp_cursorfetch appears to be a compiled system stored procedure, written by the boys and girls at Microsoft.

As such, we can't work out what parameters it takes, although I would hazard a guess that 952266979 is an id (probably of the cursor itself).

A cursor will naturally be used when MS-SQL Server is building a result set in answer to a SELECT statement. It is essentially the area of memory on the server where the rows are stored before being sent to the client. The sp_cursorfetch is the procedure that sends each row.

Instead of writing a simple SELECT statement on the client, it is also possible to directly create and fetch rows from a CURSOR. This is normally done when you want to act on each row coming back from the database individually, rather than receive them as a block of rows which can only be processed after the last one has arrived. This situation normally arises when what you want to do something horrendously complicated with each row, but don't want to store them in a temporary table and work from that.

See "DECLARE CURSOR" in Transact SQL help for further details.
vdAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 70
Victor SpiridonovCommented:
There are two ways ODBC driver can 'request' data from SQL server can send data to your application - either by executing straight select and sending all the data at once -in this case you will see 'SELECT....' statement.
In the secon case it builds cursor on the server side and uses sp_cursorfetch to fetch data in chunks.
vdAuthor Commented:
What would be the reason to use this method? Also, what
are the parameters being used, such as 952266979 ?
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