Restoring Win95 from Tape Backup

I have 25 perfectly identical computers in my classroom. One is no longer functioning at all. I  reformated the drive. I have saved a working computer's entire drive on Tape. I have the Win 95 CDs for each machine. But I don't want to go threw the laborous task of having to reinstall all the software-I can't find all the software anyway. Is there a way I can use my tape backup of a functioning computer and the WIN95 CD to fix the nonfunctioning computer??? Presently when I attempt to restore the files on the faulty machine
threw my backup I get the NON-SYSTEM-DISK statement.
lynn402Asked:
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Victor SpiridonovConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The quickest way to it would be ( in case all computers are identical)
1. Take out HDD with a C: logical disk from a working computer.
2. Put into PC you want to restore make it master HDD.
3. Change HDD that was falty computer main drive (c: ) to slave
3. Copy all the data from new master to a slave
4. Change drives back and use boot disk to make restored drive bootable.
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jkpcsCommented:
If you've already reinstalled Win95 to the machine, the first thing you have to do is make sure all your drivers (specifically for the tape drive) are there.  Can't do anything more until this is done.
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sKiiKeCommented:
Is the tape backup made with the win95 backup utitlity or some other backup utility? If it is made with the original win95 backup utility, You must install win95 first and after that You can restore the tape backup. If You use independent backup utility (Cheyenne, Seagate..), usually You can restore the tape without installing win95. To make system bootable, you must boot with boot diskette and command SYS C: Use the appropriate boot diskette ( for OSR2 make one in machine that has win95b)
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mark2150Commented:
Are you on a LAN? If so use GHOST to clone the boxes. On a LAN I set up in a school we have identical boxes and an image of a fully configured machine on the net. We have a special boot diskette that contains boot code, LAN drivers, and a link to the GHOST program on the LAN. When we boot a workstation from that diskette in less than 10 minutes we have a fully operational workstation even if the kiddies ran FDISK...

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AlexPCommented:
The problem is that simply restoring all files from tape does not initialize the bootsector, as is done when Windows is installed the usual way. If you follow the above advices, this will be solved. Of course you need a tape backup program that handles long filenames. Maybe the program does not preserve the directory attributes, e.g. the briefcase, the recycle bin and the fonts directory will not behave normally without the proper attributes.

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mark2150Commented:
The GHOST solution clones the machines fully. Disk structure, partitions, boot sectors, MBR, Desktop, icons, Machine profile, *EVERYTHING*. Just used it again yesterday.

Took two "out of the box" machines that had 2.5Gb HD split 1.2Gb/1.2Gb, booted from my trusty "rebuild" disketter. Watched for 10 minutes while GHOST did it's thing from the LAN. Cycled power on the machines and saw them boot with our custom logo. Disk was now 2.1Gb and 400Mb, etc. *perfect* on the first try.

M

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mark2150Commented:
BTW: didn't have to open the case, fiddle with jumpers, etc.
M
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
PowerQuest also makes a disk imaging program (Drive Image) which has worked quite well for me.
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