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memory > 64M

Posted on 1998-10-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I have 80 meg of memory and Linux doesn't recognize it.
Then, I edit my lilo.conf and add

append="mem=80MB"

# lilo

restart my computer, and it still doesn't work. Did I miss something?
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Question by:kobo100198
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3 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1638198
Did your BIOS recognize it?
Probably you need to setup your CMOS first.
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Author Comment

by:kobo100198
ID: 1638199
have figured it out. I should use 80M instead of 80MB
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Accepted Solution

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jetx earned 20 total points
ID: 1638200
/etc/lilo.conf
add

append="mem=80M"


-Jeff
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