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Installing Windows 95 on an unformatted hard-disk

Posted on 1998-10-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
My situation is this:
I have a computer with 2 3Gb partitions. I want to change this to 1 5.25Gb partition and 1 750Mb partition.
I have copied the entire contents of my hard disk onto CDs and have used fdisk to remove the old partitions and create new ones.
Now however, I am in a bit of a situation, since I have no OS I have no way to copy my files back onto the computer. How do I install Win 95 / 98 again?
I have a boot disk but it doesn't seem to work. The computer will access it, but not actually do anything. The computer starts up, displays the BIOS graphics and then some stuff about my devices.  Then it says 'Verifying DMA pool data...' (or at least, I think that's what it said' and sits there.

I think that's everything that's relevant.

Please answer soon.
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Question by:continuity
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15 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:continuity
ID: 1758611
Adjusted points to 200
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Expert Comment

by:irelandone
ID: 1758612
Some things to check some of which you most likily have done.
Make sure that in your bios settings you are boot from A drive first
Next check that your bootdisk does work and doesn't have an error normally you would get and error if it wasn't anyway. You will also need to have your cdrom sys file on the boot disk so that you can access your cdrom once the machine boots.
If you get that far the easies way is to format the drive partitions copy the cab file to your "D" partition and then run setup from your harddrive.
Did you make any other changes to the machine other than removing the existing partition?

Tom

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Expert Comment

by:larbel
ID: 1758613
...  If you know how to use fdisk, shouldn't you be familiar with setting up windows?

Anyway, once boot up with the startup disk, type in 'format c:/s' to format your harddrive, do the same to your d drive.  Reboot the machine, and install the CDRom driver, then reboot and insert your Win95/98 CD and run setup...
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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1758614
i think the problem is with the DMI pool data rather then anything else.

a few ways to get around this is

1. pull out your battery from the mboard to reset it

2. manually reset your mboard from the bios. either load default information or reset PNP info.

after you do that.. you should be able to boot with the boot disk. then you do a sys c: and run your install from then on.

bush
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Author Comment

by:continuity
ID: 1758615
Okay, I didn't quite make myself clear.

I don't have a prompt at which to type anything.  The computer hangs after it says 'Verifying DMA Pool Data...'

The BIOS is set to check for a boot disk and I assume the disk works because I have one for Win 95 and one for Win 98 both of which do exactly the same thing ... i.e. nothing.

I would rather not go pulling out the battery etc unless your sure that's a good idea.

Any other suggestions?
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Expert Comment

by:Snyghalt
ID: 1758616
Have you tried some antivirus program?
Yes I know you have FDISKed your hard.
I´ve found viruses in fdisked drives. . .
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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1758617
yup, that's exactly what i diagnosed it to be. DMA is this thingy which the computer uses to store data and because you changed it when you changed the partitions etc, now the computer is sorta stuck.

to fix this, follow my above directions.

bush
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Expert Comment

by:Snyghalt
ID: 1758618
But he doesn´t want to take out the batteries !
Perhaps he should use an antivirus boot disk.
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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1758619
it's hanging at the Verifying DMA Pool data. it's not even accessing the floppy drive at this point, so what difference would it make if you put in an antivirus boot disk or not?

he has to reset the motherboard, so he can get to the floppy dirve, then he put in the antivirus boot disk.

bush
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Expert Comment

by:Snyghalt
ID: 1758620
Ok, ok.
You don´t have to yell at me !
You´re right.
(hope he has a virus or else ...)
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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1758621
this is kinda off thread, but i wasn't yelling :) yelling usually happens in CAPS.

bush :)
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Accepted Solution

by:
j_powers earned 200 total points
ID: 1758622
DMA is short for Direct Memory Access. What it does is it sets aside a certain amount of memory for the I/O ports so the Operating System can run correctly.

 DMA pooling in Hard drives is used to allocate memory for larger HD's as one of it's tasks. If the DMA is stopping, then there are 2 possibilities:

1. You had a Disk control Software that is no longer there. Something like 'On Track' or similar. If you have an older motherboard, you may need this software. In order to remove it, you need to have the install disk.

2. Your Hard drive is not configured correctly in the BIOS.

When you pull out the Battery, it clears the CMOS, or all HD settings, dates and times. This may be a good idea, but I like to take a slightly different approach to this before pulling out the battery:

Go into your systems' BIOS. Check the parameters that the Hard drive is set at. Refer to your manual on the HD to make sure that is correct.

If you are not sure, or do not have a manual to the drive, then write the current settings down.

Next, you may have an option to auto detect the hard drive. Choose that option. See if this differs from the settings you have.

Another option is to change the BIOS globaly. Most BIOS have an area called 'set to optimal performance' where it will reset parameters in the BIOS to the best specs. SOme boards will then set the drives to an AUTO search.

If this whole BIOS thing is confusing, then you may want to consult with a computer consultant to get your BIOS straightened out.

Once you set the BIOS to your HD specs, try getting back into the system.

I have seen this same thing before using Maxtor Hard Drives. The motherboard had a hard time reading any hard drive with a PIO of 4, and if set to 3, then the HD would boot and run. Bottom line is that you are dealing with the HD and settings in the BIOS. The hard drives are getting bigger, and the motherboards cannot hold them anymore. Some machines have what's known as 'Flash BIOS'. Basically, you can go to the manufacturer, and they give you a program that updates your BIOS to changing times, and fixes, such as y2k.

One last thing, if you set more notes, indicate some brand names of the motherboard, the hard drive, and BIOS (usually, when you turn on the computer, you may see the name of the BIOS, a name like AMI, AWARD, etc.). This may help in more tshooting steps.
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Expert Comment

by:irelandone
ID: 1758623
I would agree with bushhead totally.  Strart from scratch in other words as bushhead said
clear your cmos by loading cmos defaults.  then simple check standard setting to ensure that you have 1.44FDD setup in A drive the rest could be auto unless as one of the above say you have an older motherboard which requires some form of diskmanger software.
I dont think this is the case from what you have discribed but it doesn't hurt to cover these points. By loading defaults you should be able to access your A drive then following instructions as listed above to format and load your software.  I normally do not used the /s switch when I format I simply format the partitions load the cab file and let 95/98 do its own thing this also stop the os looking for a cdrom when it reboots when loading from cd-drive.

Tom
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Author Comment

by:continuity
ID: 1758624
Okay, I fixed it, thanks for the help guys :)
I actually kinda want the points to go to irelandone, but j_powers gave a good answer too, so I'll stick with that.
I appreciate the help everyone.

Mike.
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Expert Comment

by:Snyghalt
ID: 1758625
Well done team.
Glad to learn a bit from you.
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