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Program failures in Windows 98

Posted on 1998-10-11
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I am running a AMD K6 233 based system with 64M memory, a 4.2 Gig HD,Matrox Mystique 220 video, Orchid Righteous 3D graphics accelerator.

The problems that I encounter are 0E & 0D errors and invalid page faults with almost every program that I run. Sometimes I don't even get as far as running them, as the setup programs fail in the same way.

I have completely re-installed Windows 98 on a clean machine (twice) to try and cure this problem, and have been on to Microsoft several times (not that they have replied!).

The programs that fail are so many and various (including things like Microsoft Works) that there is no common link apart from the Windows system. I also cannot believe that all of these programs from all the many and various software houses are making the same errors!

I've just had a 0E error come up on the print spooler whilst typing this in!

Colin
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Question by:viking022697
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dankh earned 200 total points
ID: 1646155
Colin,

 
    From what you have said above, we can rule out a software problem.  I think the problem lies within you hardware.  There are several different areas that can be the cause of your problem.  I suggest you evaluate your hardware setup extensively.


Video Drivers
A large percentage (I would personally guess at 60% or more) of reoccurring GPF problems are due to
video drivers that are either buggy or conflict with some other hardware. Make sure you are using the
latest version of the drivers for your card. I tell everyone to check this first when dealing with GPF
problems.
If you have the problems quite often, one test is to switch from the driver that is specific for your video
card to one of the generic Windows 95 drivers (the generic SVGA or VGA drivers). Run with the generic
driver for a bit and see if the problems go away. If they do, then you've pretty much narrowed the GPFs
down to that. Another good test is to go to the Video Performance tab (My Computer/Control
Panel/System/Performance/Graphics) and move the slide bar a notch or two to the left. See if the
problems go away; if so, it's a video issue, and new drivers may solve the problems.

   Faulty Secondary Cache
If you are running a system with an external secondary cache and you get a lot of GPF errors that seem
to occur randomly, you may want to try disabling the cache. This can normally be done through your
BIOS settings. If the GPFs stop, then they were likely being caused by a problem with that cache
(possibly some bad chips). Replace the cache and reenable it via BIOS. Note that in at least one reported
case, the faulty cache seemed to perform just fine under Windows 3.1, but caused constant GPFs under
Windows 95. Replacing the cache solved the problem.
[Thanks to Ber Visser for this information.]

   Faulty Memory
It's possible that a SIMM is borderline, and occassionally giving an error that causes a system lockup or
GPF. If you have a lot of RAM, try removing some of it and see if the problem continues. If not, then the
RAM you removed is likely bad. If you still have the problems, swap what you took out with what you
left in the system, to check those SIMMs.
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Expert Comment

by:BWHurst
ID: 1646156
Sometimes cache memory can cause this problem - have you tried running the system with cache memory disabled (CMOS)??
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