Coverting twips into pixels by getting the screen resolution

I want to make the window size independent of the monitor. So I need to get the screen resolution in twips and pixels. Can anybody help me out.
lesaAsked:
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clifABBConnect With a Mentor Commented:
In twips:
Width = Screen.Width
Height = Screen.Height

In pixels:
Width = Screen.Width / Screen.TwipsPerPixelX
Height = Screen.Height / Screen.TwipsPerPixelY
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lesaAuthor Commented:
Lot of thanks for your quick response. Let me make my problem clear.

I have a situaution in which I have to show the window always with a width of 11175twips what ever may be the resolution and width of  the screen.

Can I do this with your solution or should I do anything more.
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lesaAuthor Commented:
Lot of thanks for your quick response. Let me make my problem clear.

I have a situaution in which I have to show the window always with a width of 11175twips what ever may be the resolution and width of  the screen.

Can I do this with your solution or should I do anything more.
0
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lesaAuthor Commented:
Lot of thanks for your quick response. Let me make my problem clear.

I have a situaution in which I have to show the window always with a width of 11175twips what ever may be the resolution and width of  the screen.

Can I do this with your solution or should I do anything more.
0
 
clifABBCommented:
I don't think you are asking the question correctly.

If you want a form to be 11175 twips wide, then you set the width to that value.  However, at 640x480, the form will be bigger than the screen.

I think you want something else, but I'm not sure what.  Could you explain further?

VB defines twips as:
"By default, all Visual Basic movement, sizing, and graphical-drawing statements use a unit of one twip. A twip is 1/20 of a printer’s point (1,440 twips equal one inch, and 567 twips equal one centimeter). These measurements designate the size an object will be when printed. Actual physical distances on the screen vary according to the monitor size."
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lesaAuthor Commented:
Lot of thanks for your quick response. Let me make my problem clear.

I have a situaution in which I have to show the window always with a width of 11175twips what ever may be the resolution and width of  the screen.

Can I do this with your solution or should I do anything more.
0
 
lesaAuthor Commented:
I have a function for whihc I have to pass the size of the width in pixels. For that I have to change the 11175 twips into number of pixels for the monitor resolution ans size as each monitor will have different resolution and size which will effect the no of twips for pixel. So I need to know how can I get number of pixels per 11175 twips.
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lesaAuthor Commented:
I have a function for whihc I have to pass the size of the width in pixels. For that I have to change the 11175 twips into number of pixels for the monitor resolution ans size as each monitor will have different resolution and size which will effect the no of twips for pixel. So I need to know how can I get number of pixels per 11175 twips.
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clifABBCommented:
You can get the number of pixels per 11175 twips by this calculation:
  Number = 11175 / Screen.TwipsPerPixelX

The value of 'Number' will change depending only on resolution but not physical size of the monitor.
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lesaAuthor Commented:
I have a function for whihc I have to pass the size of the width in pixels. For that I have to change the 11175 twips into number of pixels for the monitor resolution ans size as each monitor will have different resolution and size which will effect the no of twips for pixel. So I need to know how can I get number of pixels per 11175 twips.
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lesaAuthor Commented:
sorry for the delay and lot of thanks
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