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Winboot.sys not found

Posted on 1998-10-16
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
Trying to reload win95 to get back some apparently corrupted files caused my registry to end up indicating that I could reboot to a previous installation.  
I discovered this by trying to create a Startup Disk and it couldn't find a couple of files including winboot.sys.  I had never encountered that problem before.  From here at EE and Bob's Trouble shooting page I determined I could copy IO.SYS to WINBOOT.SYS.  I was able to create the Startup Disk, and the next time I booted I realized that the system thought that I had a previous OS version.  I noticed references in IO.SYS of winboot.sys (if that means anything).

I want to get back to the point where my PC realizes that there are NO previous OS versions.

BTW, I ran regclean but it didn't help....at least not with this problem.

Thanks.
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Question by:jp021897
7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:bobinmad
ID: 1758736
I hate to say it, but I would start clean and copy cabs to hdd if you have to and eith format or deltree c:\windows
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Author Comment

by:jp021897
ID: 1758737
Yeah, I'd hate for you to say that too.  I may try that when icicles start forming on ol' Beezelbub's chin whiskers.

Thanks, anyway.

JP
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Expert Comment

by:wayneb
ID: 1758738
In the root of the c:\ drive look for a file called msdos.sys and see if it has a line that says bootmulti=1
if you do then make it bootmulti=0 and save the file.

Contents of the Windows Msdos.sys File
Last reviewed: July 1, 1998
Article ID: Q118579
 
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 95
Microsoft Windows 98
SUMMARY
The Windows Setup program creates a file called Msdos.sys in the root folder and sets the file's Read-Only, System, and Hidden attributes. Unlike the Msdos.sys file in MS-DOS, this file is a text file. It contains a [Paths] section that lists the locations for other Windows 95 files (such as the registry) and an [Options] section that you can use to personalize the boot process.

MORE INFORMATION
The [Paths] section can contain the following settings:

HostWinBootDrv=<Root of Boot Drive>

Default: C

Purpose: Specifies the location for the root of the boot drive.

UninstallDir=<Root of Boot Drive>

Default: C

Purpose: Specifies the location of the W95undo.dat and W95undo.ini

          files. These files are necessary to uninstall Windows 95.


NOTE: This setting is present only if you back up your system files when you are prompted during Windows 95 Setup.

WinBootDir=<Windows Directory>

Default: Directory specified during Setup (for example, C:\WINDOWS)

Purpose: Lists the location of the necessary files for booting.

WinDir=<Windows Directory>

Default: Directory specified during Setup (for example, C:\WINDOWS)

Purpose: Lists the location of the Windows 95 directory specified

          during Setup.


The [Options] section can contain the following settings and must be manually inserted:

AutoScan=<Number>

Default: 1

Purpose: Defines whether or not ScanDisk is run after a bad shutdown.

          A setting of 0 does not run ScanDisk; 1 prompts before
          running ScanDisk; 2 does not prompt before running
          ScanDisk but prompts you before fixing errors if any
          errors are found.

          This setting is used only by OEM Service Release 2.


BootDelay=<Seconds>

Default: 2

Purpose: Sets the amount of time the "Starting Windows" message

          remains on the screen before Windows 95 continues to boot.


NOTE: BootDelay is not supported in Windows 98.

BootSafe=<Boolean>

Default: 0

Purpose: A setting of 1 forces your computer to boot in safe mode.

BootGUI=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 forces the loading of the GUI interface. A

          setting of 0 disables the loading of the GUI interface.


BootKeys=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 enables the use of the function key boot

          options (that is, F4, F5, F6, and F8). A setting of 0 disables
          the use of these function keys during the boot process


NOTE: A setting of BootKeys=0 overrides the use of BootDelay=n.

BootMenu=<Boolean>

Default: 0

Purpose: A setting of 1 enables the Startup menu. If this setting is 0,

          then you must press the F8 key when "Starting Windows 95"
          appears, (or press and hold the CTRL key when your Windows
          98-based computer restarts) to invoke the Startup menu.


BootMenuDefault=<Number>

Default: 1 if the system is running correctly

          3 if the system hung in the previous instance


Purpose: Use this setting to set the default menu item for startup.

BootMenuDelay=<Number>

Default: 30

Purpose: This setting is used to set the number of seconds your system

          will pause on the Startup menu. If the number of seconds counts
          down to 0 without intervention, the BootMenuDefault is activated.


NOTE: This option is not functional unless BootMenu=1 has been added to the [Options] section of the Msdos.sys file.

BootMulti=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 0 disables the multi-boot option. (For example,

          with a setting of 0 you cannot boot your previous operating
          system.) A setting of 1 enables the F4 and F8 keys to boot your
          previous operating system.


BootWarn=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 0 disables the safe mode boot warning message and

          the Startup menu.


BootWin=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 forces Windows 95 to load at startup. A setting

          of 0 disables Windows 95 as your default operating system (this
          is useful only if you have MS-DOS version 5.x or 6.x on the
          computer).


NOTE: Pressing F4 inverts the default only if BootMulti=1. (For example,

      pressing the F4 key with a setting of 0 forces Windows 95 to load.)


DoubleBuffer=<Boolean>

Default: 0

Purpose: A setting of 1 is a conditional setting that enables double-

          buffering for controllers that need it (for example, SCSI
          controllers). A setting of 2 is an unconditional setting that
          enables double-buffering regardless of whether the controller
          needs it or not.


DBLSpace=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 allows the automatic loading of the DBLSPACE.BIN

          file. A setting of 0 prevents the automatic loading of this
          file.


NOTE: Windows 95 uses either Dblspace.bin or Drvspace.bin if either is present in the root folder of the boot drive at startup. To disable a compression driver from being loaded at startup, use both settings in the Msdos.sys file. For example:

   DBLSpace=0
   DRVSpace=0


DRVSpace=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 allows the automatic loading of the DRVSPACE.BIN

          file. A setting of 0 prevents the automatic loading of this
          file.


NOTE: Windows 95 uses either Dblspace.bin or Drvspace.bin if either is present in the root folder of the boot drive at startup. To disable a compression driver from being loaded at startup, use both settings in the Msdos.sys file. For example:

   DBLSpace=0
   DRVSpace=0


LoadTop=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 0 does not let Windows 95 load COMMAND.COM or

          DRVSPACE.BIN/DBLSPACE.BIN at the top of 640K. If you are having
          compatibility problems with software that makes assumptions about
          the available memory try setting this to 0.


Logo=<Boolean>

Default: 1

Purpose: A setting of 1 forces the default Windows 95 logo to appear. A

         setting of 0 prevents the animated logo from being displayed.
         A setting of 0 also avoids hooking a variety of interrupts
         that can create incompatibilities with certain third-party
         memory managers.


Network=<Boolean>

Default: 0

Purpose: A setting of 1 means the network was installed and adds "Safe

          mode with network support" as an option on the Windows 95
          Startup menu.


The Msdos.sys file also contains a section that contains seemingly useless information. This information is necessary to support programs that expect the Msdos.sys file to be at least 1024 bytes in length. For example, if an anti-virus program detects that the Msdos.sys file is less than 1024 bytes, it may assume that the Msdos.sys file is infected with a virus. If you delete the Msdos.sys file your computer will not start.

The following statement, followed by a series of "X"s, appears in the Msdos.sys file:

   ;The following lines are required for compatibility with other programs.
   ;Do not remove them (Msdos.sys needs to be >1024 bytes).


Since each line begins with a semicolon (;), the lines are not read by the system.

How to Edit the Msdos.sys File
If you want to change any of the values in the Msdos.sys file, follow these steps to edit the file:

 
Click Start, point to Find, then click Files Or Folders.
In the Named box, type "msdos.sys" (without quotation marks). In the Look In box, click your boot drive (usually drive C, or drive H if drive C is compressed). Click the Find Now button.
Right-click the Msdos.sys file and then click Properties.
Click the Read-Only and Hidden check boxes to clear them to remove these attributes from the Msdos.sys file, and then click OK.
Right-click the Msdos.sys file and then click Open With.
In the "Choose the program you want to use" box, click WordPad and then click OK.
Make the changes you want to the Msdos.sys file. When you are done, save the file as a text document, and then quit WordPad.
Right-click the Msdos.sys file, and then click Properties.
Click the Read-Only and Hidden check boxes to select them to set these attributes for the file, and then click OK. Close the Find window.
Quit and then restart Windows.  



 

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Author Comment

by:jp021897
ID: 1758739
wayneb,
That looks like a very logical solution.  I thought there was somewhere here that I could click to accept the answer.  I can't find it but I think you suggestion will do it.  Course, I won't know till I try it.
Thanks a million....or at least thanks a 100.

JP
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Accepted Solution

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elc_music earned 100 total points
ID: 1758740
yes, that is correct, BUT since this file a SYSTEM+READ ONLY file you CAN NOT save it in Norton or other editors.
SO
1. cancel the file attr (read only and system) edit, save and re set attrb.
OR
get te SNWIN (system notbook) pgm from the internet (I forgot where I got it) run it and edit what you need.
OR
you can re install 95 from CD-rom (and DONT erase old win folder) just clock the " RESTORE FILES THAT CHANGED OR CORRUPTED" and that in most cases but not always, work well.
ELC.
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:elc_music
ID: 1758741
Sorry for type mismach.
1. Snwin = System Notebook.
2. Where i typed just clock I ment Click.
sorry.
ELC.
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:elc_music
ID: 1758742
For even MORE help for keeping 95 runnig, look for WINCONFIG pgm on the internet.
its a good pgm and let you do good to your sys.
ELC.
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