Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people, just like you, are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
Solved

Calculating a series in Excel

Posted on 1998-10-21
4
1,213 Views
Last Modified: 2008-03-10
How do I calculate a series in Excel? By  series I mean
    something like the sum of
    [E**1/1!]+[E**2/2!]+......[E**x/x!]
    E**x means E to the power X.
0
Comment
Question by:PaganPig
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:frazer
ID: 1614101
Hi,

You need to use the formula SERIESSUM.

FInd below an extract of the help file

Returns the sum of a power series based on the formula:

Many functions can be approximated by a power series expansion.
If this function is not available, run the Setup program to install the Analysis ToolPak. After you install the Analysis ToolPak, you must enable it by using the Add-Ins command on the Tools menu.

How?

Syntax

SERIESSUM(x,n,m,coefficients)

X   is the input value to the power series.

N   is the initial power to which you want to raise x.

M   is the step by which to increase n for each term in the series.

Coefficients   is a set of coefficients by which each successive power of x is multiplied. The number of values in coefficients determines the number of terms in the power series. For example, if there are three values in coefficients, then there will be three terms in the power series.

Remark

If any argument is nonnumeric, SERIESSUM returns the #VALUE! error value.


Hope this helps

Frazer
0
 

Author Comment

by:PaganPig
ID: 1614102
Frazer's answer is simply a cut and paste from the Excel help file. I need to know how to apply the formula.

Relating the example I gave, [E**1/1!]+[E**2/2!]+......[E**y/y!], to the help file:
    X (the input value to the power series) = E;
    N (the initial power to which you want to raise x) = 1;
    M (the step by which to increase n for each term in the series) =1

I need to know how to do the following in order to use the formula. How do I
    a) specify a value for y - ie, the upper limit for y?
    b) define [1/y!] as the coefficient?

 
0
 
LVL 5

Accepted Solution

by:
vboukhar earned 50 total points
ID: 1614103
Maybe I don't understand something, but I think, SERIESSUM could not be used in this situation. Why not write user defined function like that:
Function MySeries(e As Double, x As Integer)
  MySeries = 0
  For i = 1 To x
    MySeries = MySeries + Application.Power(e, i / Application.Fact(i))
  Next i
End Function
and use it in cell's formula etc. :-)
0
 

Author Comment

by:PaganPig
ID: 1614104
Thanks, it works1
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: ZipGrep

ZipGrep is a utility that can list and search zip (.war, .ear, .jar, etc) archives for text patterns, without the need to extract the archive's contents.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way to say thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In case Office 2010 has not been deployed in your environment, this article may be quite useful. In our office, we wanted a way to deploy Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2010 through an automated batch file via logon script. This article is docum…
Entering a date in Microsoft Access can be tricky. A typo can cause month and day to be shuffled, entering the day only causes an error, as does entering, say, day 31 in June. This article shows how an inputmask supported by code can help the user a…
Learn how to create and modify your own paragraph styles in Microsoft Word. This can be helpful when wanting to make consistently referenced styles throughout a document or template.
Polish reports in Access so they look terrific. Take yourself to another level. Equations, Back Color, Alternate Back Color. Write easy VBA Code. Tighten space to use less pages. Launch report from a menu, considering criteria only when it is filled…

856 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question