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upgrading kernel, module-info, and system-map

Posted on 1998-10-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I've just upgraded my kernel for the first time (from 2.0.31 to 2.0.35)
I am using Redhat 5.0 distribution, and by default, at /boot,  I have:

  system-map -> system-map-2.0.31
  module-info -> module-info-2.0.31
  vmlinuz -> vmlinuz-2.0.31

Ok, I have copied the new kernel to /boot, and named it vmlinuz-2.0.35 and
changed the symbolic link for vmlinuz to point to vmlinuz-2.0.35

I also have done 'make modules' and 'make modules_install' and this will place
all modules at /lib/modules/2.0.35/

Now, I have no idea how to do with system-map and module-info at /boot
because after building the kernel, I didn't get the files module-info-2.0.35
and system-map-2.0.35. Do I need to delete the system-map and module-info
symbolic links, or just leave them? Or, should I create files
module-info-2.0.35 and system-map-2.0.35? If yes, HOW?

Also, at /lib/modules, i have 2.0.31 modules. How can I know for sure that kernel will not look for module at old 2.0.31 module?
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Question by:kobo100198
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Author Comment

by:kobo100198
ID: 1631157
Edited text of question
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Expert Comment

by:fmismetti
ID: 1631158
After configuration of your kernel (make menuconfig or make config), just execute:

make dep ; make clean
make
make modules
make modules_install
make zlilo

The last line will take care of installing the new kernel and setting up the LInux LOader.

This is true for Slackware and should be true to RedHat. I don't have way to test in RedHat, so I'm posting this as a comment.

Let me know if it works...
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Author Comment

by:kobo100198
ID: 1631159
I have done what you said before. Your comment is unrelated with my question. Here I post my question again:

I have no idea what to do with system-map and module-info that I found at /boot
because after building the kernel (this includes ALL make modules, make modules_install, do LILO stuff), I didn't get the files module-info-2.0.35
and system-map-2.0.35. Do I need to delete the system-map and module-info
symbolic links, or just leave them there ? Or, should I create files module-info-2.0.35 and system-map-2.0.35? If yes, HOW?
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Accepted Solution

by:
xterm earned 100 total points
ID: 1631160
You can just copy the System.map file from the top directory
of the kernel source tree to /boot as is.  Don't worry about
the module-info file in /boot - you can rm it if you want.

When you boot 2.0.35 it won't load the modules in the 2.0.31
directory - in fact, after you've safely tested your new
kernel you can whack /lib/modules/2.0.31 - If I'm not mistaken
kerneld will do a uname before loading modules, so it won't
mix up versions.

As a side note, RH5.1 puts a symlink in /lib/modules called
"preferred" which points to the current kernel version
module directory.  
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