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"my ($var) = $ARGV[0]" vs "my ($var); $var = $ARGV[0]"

Posted on 1998-10-24
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Last Modified: 2010-03-05
The following doesn't work if I ran script without parameters:

# doesn't work!
my ($login) = $ARGV[0] or die "$0: login parameter not set!\n";

And if I modify the text:

# it works
my ($login);
$login = $ARGV[0] or die "$0: login parameter not set!\n";

- everything is ok.

What is the difference? When it is possible to use my() in assignments?
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Question by:dda
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6 Comments
 
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Author Comment

by:dda
ID: 1205695
Thanks. It works.
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Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 1205694
#my ($login) is a list, and a list assignment returns its length.  try:
my $login = $ARGV[0] or die "$0: login parameter not set!\n";

#(but note that it also dies if you give the parameter "0")
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Author Comment

by:dda
ID: 1205696
2ozo: Why do you leave this question unlocked? Are you on a vacation? :)
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 1205697
I wanted to wait for any followup questions.
The difference is not in the my.  it's the difference between a list assignment and a scalar assignment.
 ($login) = $ARGV[0] or die "$0: login parameter not set!\n";
will do the same thing as your first example.
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Author Comment

by:dda
ID: 1205698
Ok, I'm getting more familiar with all this stuff, thanks. Please take your points. Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
Dmitry.
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Accepted Solution

by:
ozo earned 50 total points
ID: 1205699
 my ($login)
#is a list

  my $login
#is a scalar

# or evaluates its left argument as a scalar
#the scalar value of the assignment
  $login = $ARGV[0]
#or
  my $login = $ARGV[0]
#is the value assigned

#the scalar value of the assignment
  ($login) = $ARGV[0]
#or
  my ($login) = $ARGV[0]
#or
 (my $login) = $ARGV[0]
#is the number of values assigned
0

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