Solved

lilo on slackware 3.5

Posted on 1998-10-26
15
387 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi, I am trying to install lilo on a win98 slackware 3.5 system.  I have tryed the simple install of lilo and it installs fine. It lets me get into 98 fine but when it goes into linux it says the umsdos file system is read only. How do I change it?
Here is my lilo.confg and my fstab file:
lilo.config:
# LILO configuration file
# generated by 'liloconfig'
#
# Start LILO global section
boot = /dev/hda
message = /boot/boot_message.txt
prompt
timeout = 1200
vga = normal
# End LILO global section
# DOS bootable partition config begins
other = /dev/hda1
  label = DOS
  table = /dev/hda
# DOS bootable partition config ends
# Linux bootable partition config begins
image = /vmlinuz
  root = /dev/hda5
  label = Linux
  read-only
# Linux bootable partition config ends
fstab:
/dev/hda5       /        umsdos        defaults   1   0
/dev/hdb       /cdrom        iso9660       ro   0   0
none             /proc    proc        defaults   0   0
0
Comment
Question by:laeuchli
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
15 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Sieger
ID: 1631245
image = /vmlinuz
      root = /dev/hda5
      label = Linux
*      read-only

Take that line off
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631246
didn't fix it. It still boots umsdos as read only.

0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Sieger
ID: 1631247
Did you type lilo after you made the changes?
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631248
I type liloconfg. I know it stuck because I made one other change the timeout thing.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Sieger
ID: 1631249
I think everytime you made a change in lilo you have to type "lilo" in order for it to be affected.  
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631250
I change them at the same time.

0
 

Expert Comment

by:olvo
ID: 1631251
You always want lilo to start the boot fase in read only mode. This will save your file system from being corrupted if some doesn't go well.
The file system is normally remapped and change to read-write as the system starts up,
it fsck ed, and then remounts.
As pointed before you can change the line in the lilo.conf by read-write, but again, this is not recommended.
Check your installation, maybe your missing the continuation of the boot process, when  
the file system will be fsck ed and remount.
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631252
that does not help you did not tell me how to fix it.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:olvo
ID: 1631253
Your question was if you could change the read only to read-write, the answer was yes, but not at lilo boot.
If you want any help, you need to tell where your linux partition and swap partitions are
located.
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631254
I don't have a swap partion and my linux partion is on drive d: or /dev/hda5

0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
olvo earned 50 total points
ID: 1631255
Sorry for the delay, but I could not reach the Experts server.
If your system was working before you can remount the file system in read-write mode:
a) If /etc/fstab is correct -> mount -n -o remount /
 -n -o are necessary so mount don't try to write to /etc/mntab. (This still in read only mode)

b) If /etc/fstab is wrong -> mount -n -o remount -f umsdos /dev/hd5 /

I never used Linux in an umsdos file system. I always thought that the umsdos is only for
Linux access to DOS files with long names. Normally you would use ext2 for Linux. Also a UNIX without swap space is different. Just for my own curiosity, how your system perform? What kind of programs you run? How it compare with Win98?


0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631256
It runs fine. Crashes less then win98
0
 

Expert Comment

by:olvo
ID: 1631257
I was reviewing my comment and looks like I didn't type the whole command for remout.
You need to add a ,rw after the remount.
it should look like this
mount -n -o remount,rw -f umsdos /dev/hd5 /
or
mount -n -o remount,rw /

 Good luck
0
 
LVL 5

Author Comment

by:laeuchli
ID: 1631258
So to make this work I have get into linux, mak the chane to fstab. Right?

0
 

Expert Comment

by:olvo
ID: 1631259
You can make the change in /etc/fstab, or to  the "/etc/rc.d/rc.system"start up script, or the equivalent file if you not using the System V boot style.

I think it would be beneficial to create a swap space. UNIX stile OS need to have this form of virtual memory to perform at the best. You can easily create a swap after the system is
running, without a  swap partition, like:

dd if=/dev/xxx of=/swap bs=1024 count=8208
# this creates a swap file of 8208 blocks (8Mbytes)

mkswap /swap 8208
# initializes the swap file

swapon swap
# now th e system is swapping to this file


to end

swapoff /swap
rm /swap

Of couse all this commands can be added to the files in the /etc/rc.d/... script to automate the process.


0

Featured Post

Windows Server 2016: All you need to know

Learn about Hyper-V features that increase functionality and usability of Microsoft Windows Server 2016. Also, throughout this eBook, you’ll find some basic PowerShell examples that will help you leverage the scripts in your environments!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Run Secure WMI query from CentOS 5 148
Apache module 5 68
Time Sync Best Practice 13 49
regular expression help for sed command 5 43
This document is written for Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS release 4 and ORACLE 10g.  Earlier releases can be installed using this document as well however there are some additional steps for packages to be installed see Metalink. Disclaimer: I hav…
The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how we can use conditional statements using Python.
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

696 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question