lilo on slackware 3.5

Hi, I am trying to install lilo on a win98 slackware 3.5 system.  I have tryed the simple install of lilo and it installs fine. It lets me get into 98 fine but when it goes into linux it says the umsdos file system is read only. How do I change it?
Here is my lilo.confg and my fstab file:
lilo.config:
# LILO configuration file
# generated by 'liloconfig'
#
# Start LILO global section
boot = /dev/hda
message = /boot/boot_message.txt
prompt
timeout = 1200
vga = normal
# End LILO global section
# DOS bootable partition config begins
other = /dev/hda1
  label = DOS
  table = /dev/hda
# DOS bootable partition config ends
# Linux bootable partition config begins
image = /vmlinuz
  root = /dev/hda5
  label = Linux
  read-only
# Linux bootable partition config ends
fstab:
/dev/hda5       /        umsdos        defaults   1   0
/dev/hdb       /cdrom        iso9660       ro   0   0
none             /proc    proc        defaults   0   0
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laeuchliAsked:
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olvoConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Sorry for the delay, but I could not reach the Experts server.
If your system was working before you can remount the file system in read-write mode:
a) If /etc/fstab is correct -> mount -n -o remount /
 -n -o are necessary so mount don't try to write to /etc/mntab. (This still in read only mode)

b) If /etc/fstab is wrong -> mount -n -o remount -f umsdos /dev/hd5 /

I never used Linux in an umsdos file system. I always thought that the umsdos is only for
Linux access to DOS files with long names. Normally you would use ext2 for Linux. Also a UNIX without swap space is different. Just for my own curiosity, how your system perform? What kind of programs you run? How it compare with Win98?


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SiegerCommented:
image = /vmlinuz
      root = /dev/hda5
      label = Linux
*      read-only

Take that line off
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
didn't fix it. It still boots umsdos as read only.

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SiegerCommented:
Did you type lilo after you made the changes?
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
I type liloconfg. I know it stuck because I made one other change the timeout thing.
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SiegerCommented:
I think everytime you made a change in lilo you have to type "lilo" in order for it to be affected.  
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
I change them at the same time.

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olvoCommented:
You always want lilo to start the boot fase in read only mode. This will save your file system from being corrupted if some doesn't go well.
The file system is normally remapped and change to read-write as the system starts up,
it fsck ed, and then remounts.
As pointed before you can change the line in the lilo.conf by read-write, but again, this is not recommended.
Check your installation, maybe your missing the continuation of the boot process, when  
the file system will be fsck ed and remount.
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
that does not help you did not tell me how to fix it.
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olvoCommented:
Your question was if you could change the read only to read-write, the answer was yes, but not at lilo boot.
If you want any help, you need to tell where your linux partition and swap partitions are
located.
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
I don't have a swap partion and my linux partion is on drive d: or /dev/hda5

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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
It runs fine. Crashes less then win98
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olvoCommented:
I was reviewing my comment and looks like I didn't type the whole command for remout.
You need to add a ,rw after the remount.
it should look like this
mount -n -o remount,rw -f umsdos /dev/hd5 /
or
mount -n -o remount,rw /

 Good luck
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laeuchliAuthor Commented:
So to make this work I have get into linux, mak the chane to fstab. Right?

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olvoCommented:
You can make the change in /etc/fstab, or to  the "/etc/rc.d/rc.system"start up script, or the equivalent file if you not using the System V boot style.

I think it would be beneficial to create a swap space. UNIX stile OS need to have this form of virtual memory to perform at the best. You can easily create a swap after the system is
running, without a  swap partition, like:

dd if=/dev/xxx of=/swap bs=1024 count=8208
# this creates a swap file of 8208 blocks (8Mbytes)

mkswap /swap 8208
# initializes the swap file

swapon swap
# now th e system is swapping to this file


to end

swapoff /swap
rm /swap

Of couse all this commands can be added to the files in the /etc/rc.d/... script to automate the process.


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