Solved

ICQ in linux

Posted on 1998-10-27
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Last Modified: 2010-04-22
Hello there!
            I am using Linux to connect to Internet. I have obtained and installed Zircon as well as netscape which was included in KDE .I recently also downloaded ICQ java for Linux from mirabili's website . I uncompressed it and tried to install it . However ICQ's installation program asks for the directory in which Java is stored . I , of course , have no idea which directory that is and so i am asking anyone who might know via this service . Do you know in which directory does Linux store Java ?
   And another thing , i am from Greece and i would like to be able to see Greek characters . How do i do that and where do i download the fonts from ?

 Thanks,
       Mixelogj

p.s. If it helps , i am informing you that i am using Redhat 5,1
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Question by:mixelogj
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davidmwilliams earned 200 total points
ID: 1638377
Hi, Mixelogj,
  Where java is stored may vary, presuming it is installed.  What you should first do is type the command

   which java

and Linux will then tell you if the java interpreter is installed, and in your PATH.

  Depending on the result, you have two options :)

Firstly, if you do get a result, e.g. /usr/local/bin/java, it could mean the file is a
symbolic link and not actually the installed location.  Follow the command up by an ls -l
like so --

  ls -l /usr/local/bin/java

and if it is a link, then you will see something like this

   /usr/local/bin/java -> /usr/java/bin/java

  In that case, the file to the right of the arrow (->) is where java has been installed.  Note, you need to extract the ending /bin/java from the path, because that points to the java executable, not just the installed directory.

  If it is not a link, then you have your answer just like that.

  Now !  If the which command does not yield a result, check your system to see if java has been installed somewhere, using find.  Do this --

cd /
find . -name java -print

  and your hard disk will rattle!  This command will display all files and directories on your system with the name 'java', and this should show you the full path.

  If this does not yield a result, then you don't hava java installed.  Re-run the redhat setup, or use rpms to install new packages -- or even the control-panel program.

Regards,
 David Williams
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by:mixelogj
ID: 1638378
thanks ! i will try your suggestion out and evaluate your answer accordingly :-)

mixelogj
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by:mixelogj
ID: 1638379
i found out that i probably haven't installed java . however i do not want to re-run redhat's setup because most of the settings.... etc will be lost .the program at control panel about the packages has a bug and will freeze when searching the cd for available packages at 80 % ( approximately ) . how can i install java ?
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by:davidmwilliams
ID: 1638380
Hi Miselogj,

  Ok, this is straightforward enough ... although I'm sorry to hear about the RedHat problem.  Maybe that's another question for you to post :)
  What you can do is download Linux for Java from the WWW.  Go to http://www.blackdown.org/java-linux.html and you can get it from there.
  It will be a .tar.gz (or .tgz) file, which means you need to unpack it on your system.  First, think about where you'd like to install it (/usr/local is probably a good place) and then use some commands like the following (replace 'java' with the appropriate filename that you downloaded) ...

  mv java.tgz /usr/local
  cd /usr/local
  gunzip java.tgz   (this will uncompress, leaving a tar file)
  tar xf java.tar   (this will extract the archive)

  Now, use ls to make sure you have a java (or jdk) directory.  Inspect it for a bit to make sure you have a lib directory with a file called classes.zip, and make sure you have a bin directory with java, javac, etc.
  If all is ok, you can get rid of the archive -

  rm java.tar

  and now, edit your startup files so that you have a CLASSPATH variable, like so -

  CLASSPATH=/usr/local/java/lib/classes.zip
  export CLASSPATH

also, make sure /usr/local/java/bin is in your PATH.

  You should now be able to use Java fine !  And also, you will know the path to give to ICQ.  I've used the Java ICQ on my Solaris system and it works fine.

Regards,
 David Williams
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by:mixelogj
ID: 1638381
Thanks ! i will try this out . Even if i fail however ( i am quite nes in Linux ) i am going to use micq or zicq . Thanks again davidwilliam !
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by:davidmwilliams
ID: 1638382
Hopefully you won't fail -- do let me know how it goes.
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by:mixelogj
ID: 1638384
thanks crubbert ! i'll check that !
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