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Device or resource is busy error

Posted on 1998-10-28
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Last Modified: 2008-03-17
I am backing up a RedHat Linux-based server to a Hewlett Packard DLT 40e SCSI-based drive.  I have been just using the tar cvf /dev/st0 / command to initiate a backup and tar xvf....... to restore from it.  For two months this has been working fine.  All of a sudden I am getting a 'device or resource is busy' error after I type in the tar cvf....command.  I am new to Unix and Linux and am not that familiar with kernel and device manipulation/problem solving. Would anyone know why this would happen all of a sudden?  
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Question by:nolan102898
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davidmwilliams earned 50 total points
ID: 2007606
 If the device or resource is busy, then it is in use.  For example, if you mounted an NFS volume, then used cd to move into it, and then tried to umount it, you would get this error.
  It sounds like your device /dev/st0 is in use when you type your command - could it be you have another window or process open that is reading from the device in some way?
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