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irritating sound on copied audio cd

Posted on 1998-10-29
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Last Modified: 2010-04-27
I've got a Philips 3610 cd-rewriter and an Atapi 8 speed cd-rom player. When I'm copying audio cd's there's an irritating noise on the background of the songs when I play them on a regular cd-player. Like when you're on the telephone and the line is disturbed. Is there anything I can do about this??
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Question by:atlanta102998
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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128003
Edited text of question
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128004
atlanta,
Is the noise present when playing the CD using your CD-R or a CDROM on the computer?
If not, be aware that the problem may be because not all audio CD players can handle recordable media.
(Many CDROMs can't read CD-R/W media either.)
Regards,
Ralph

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Expert Comment

by:pjmaze
ID: 1128005
Hi,
i had the same problem once, and after some time i find it !
First i record one audio CD with CD Copy option (i have a PlexWriter and use WinOnCD )and the sound in a regular CD player was bad !! but in the PC was fine ?!? then i copy the CD in a multisession CD and then it worked FINE. So the problem is the way you copy the tracks, because CDR have different ways of reading the audio or non audio data.

see ya
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1128006
I don't think that answer will help because audio CD players cannot read multi-session CDs.  They only see/read the first track on the disk.
Atlanta, we need some feedback from you.
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128007
I've tried this one and it didn't work for me! Another tip I got from a friend of mine is to first copy the audio to the harddisk and then copy it to the cd-writable. Because the buffer of the cd-rewriter is full, it'll stop and then empty the buffer and load it again if you copy it directly. That must be the sound I heard. I have to try this suggestion but has anyone any comments?
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128008
I'm afraid that a buffer under-run, as it's called, will render your recording session useless.  Certainly not the cause of the noise you have described.
If the CD in question will play okay on the recorder, without the noise, then I suggest you try it in a different CD audio player.
Are you using CD-R or CD-R/W media?
Regards,
Ralph
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Expert Comment

by:j_powers
ID: 1128009
Hi, atlanta. I would like to take this a different direction.

When I record to my Mitsubishi CDR, I can get a hissy type sound if I record waves in a 8 bit format. The quality is just not there. Therefore, I have these questions for you.

You said that you have an 8 speed CD ROM. I also take it you have an older computer?

With this 8x CD ROM, you have a sound card. Is it onboard, or is it a card like Sound blaster, or turtle beach.

Next question: is the CD hooked up to the sound card?

The reason why I ask these questions is I want to find the path that your CD ROM goes to the CDR. If it goes through a sound blaster card, for example, and the card is a 8 or 16 bit card, then it will push out data 16 bit and you may loose quality when recording. If it is 32 bit, then your quality will be 32 bit. Think of it as putting a stereo on one end, and your ear on the other end of two cans and a string. The stereo, even though balanced perfectly for sound will become distorted when it reaches your ear if you are listening with two cans and a string.

Next question: your CDR, is it Parallel, IDE, or SCSI? If IDE, how is it connected in your computer - hooked up to the CDROM, or the hard drive. If you have a Parallel port CDR, then make sure that your computer reads it as a ECP port. The setting will be in the BIOS.

Here is a test: Take a song (or set of songs) and copy them as waves on your computer (if you have the space). Record a CD that way. Does the hiss go away?

I know that there is a lot here, but give it a try, and let me know what happens.

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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1128010
32 bit sound card? that's a new one....


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Expert Comment

by:j_powers
ID: 1128011
Why is that a new one? Have you never heard of a 32 bit sound card?
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Expert Comment

by:bushhead
ID: 1128012
no i haven't heard of one... i have heard of having 32 waveforms etc...

check this out

http://home.earthlink.net/~fmah/bitbyte.html

bush

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Expert Comment

by:ddmorgan
ID: 1128013
First a question how have you got your cd player hooked to the recorder? Now try this go by Radio Shack and get a ferite donout the run your audio out cable ( the one that comes from your playing cd drive) through this and wrap several turns around the donout then plug it back into the sound card this should act as a noise filter.
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128014
C'mon ddmorgan, don't you think suggestions like that are better submitted as a comment rather than the "answer"?
It saves a lot of confusion for newcomers here when they don't have to deal with rejecting lame answers.
The only audio signals being passed from CDROM to CD-Recorder in this setup are on the IDE bus, not the sound card.
If you truly know about CD recording you should know that a soundcard isn't even needed to record an audio CD!
Ralph
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Expert Comment

by:j_powers
ID: 1128015
bushhead: It doesn't matter about 8 16, or 32 bits, the whole point is that having the CD ROM hooked up to the soundcard (secondary IDE, with it's primary job is to pump out sound) to go to the CDR is a long way for data to travel, as opposed to CD ROM to IDE (whose only funtion is to transfer data) to CDR.  

Atlanta: Please let me know what you have for a setup.
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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128016
Because I haven't got the slightest idea of what you're talking about I have to reject this answer. Maybe if you explain it better it will be a good answer. Call me stupid or something but I'm kinda new and I don't understand your answer
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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128017
I have a comment for j-powers or others who need more info to solve this problem. I've got an older computer a pentium 100. And the cd-rewriter is IDE and with one splitted cable connected to the cd-player who is connected to the motherboard (?). If I copy a sound file as wav. to the computer there's no hiss. I've got a soundblaster 16 as a soundcard. I hope this will help. As I can't use the internet everyday I can't reply very soon. I hope you will forgive me.
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128018
atlanta,
Does the noise occur when playing the CD in your cd-rewriter, or only in the audio CD player?
Ralph
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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128019
The noise occurs when playing on any cd-player and my cd-rewriter unfortunately
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128020
Okay.
How was the source for your audio file recorded?
Was the source "ripped" with an audio editing program, or did you use DAE from your CD-R?
(DAE = Digital Audio Extraction)
Ralph

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Expert Comment

by:j_powers
ID: 1128021
OK, let me know this:

You say that you have an IDE 8x CD ROM, and a IDE CDRW. I assume you also have an IDE Hard drive. Do you have any thing else connected to the IDE controller besides the previous mentioned, or floppy drives? Do you only have one Hard drive.

Next question is this: You have 3 devices, and 2 cables to IDE slots. Can you tell me if the CDRW is hooked up on the same cable as the CD ROM, or the Hard drive? If it is on the same cable as the Hard drive, I would suggest putting it on the CD ROM cable.

Finally: you say you have a Sound Blaster 16. Have you checked for any updated drivers?

Let me know what you find.
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128022
One more question:
What is the software used for your audio CD recording?

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Expert Comment

by:datn
ID: 1128023
To record audio songs, four things are extremely important to get good quality.

1. You must digitally extract and save as wave files to your hard drive. When you create the CD layout, select the songs from the hard drive and not the original CD. Also, listen to each wave file before recording, especially if you know you have bad scratched up CD's.
2. Stop other applications from running, like antivirus and screensavers. These take up a lot of memory.
3. Turn off auto-insert notification.
4. Select disc-at-once and add a 2 second gap between songs. If you don't, you will get an annoying pop at the end of each song, because the laser powers down waiting for more data to enter the buffer.

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Accepted Solution

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harrys earned 200 total points
ID: 1128024
There are many reasons for bad audio quality when coping audio CD's
1. Your CD reader doesn't route the data thru the error correction when doing digital audio extraction. if there are small readerrors while extraction these will not get corrected and
burned to the copy where they will become permanent. To solve this try to grap with lower datarates (double speed or single speed). If this doesn't solve the problem try to grab the audio on a different CD reader (Plextor drives are usally got for audio extraction, a friend might have one..)
2. Early audio CD players were not designed with CDR's in mind, CDRs don't reflect the laser as good as the orignal CDs do. There are CDRs designed to solve this problems, for example the TDK Reflex
3. Sometimes there are irritating effects were a CDR writer doesn't seem to "like" a particular bunch of CDRs. You can write to them successfully, but you cdrom only reads them slowly, audio cd player didn'tt read it at all etc. There is nothing you can do when this happens, try a different brand..

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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128025
I've got my problem solved, although not through your answer but the first answer you give is the most correct. I've tried to play from my cd-recorder to the harddrive and then copy it to the recorder again with an empty cdr in it. And it worked!! So I know  now the problem is with my cd-player! I've tried to change the speed but that didn't solve the problem. I think I just have to buy a new one...

I want to thank everybody very much for their response and it has been a great help solving the problem.
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128026
atlanta,
I don't understand why you would accept an "answer" that did not solve your problem??
Ralph
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Expert Comment

by:j_powers
ID: 1128027
I also would mention that although you have found a workaround, buying a new CD ROM may not solve your answer.

Just playing devils advocate here.
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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128028
As I have "solved" the problem on my own, but the answer harrys gave is correct. I've tried it on another cd-reader (in this case my cd-rewritable) an that did work. So it must be something with my cd-player.
Maybe it doesn't solve the problem to buy a new one, but as I'm working on this problem, and being annoyed everytime a cd messes up, for almost three months I'm glad I've found a way to work around the problem and I was planning on buying a new cd-player anyway.

But thanx again for your concern, and when I do have a problem with the new player I'll come back here.
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Expert Comment

by:rmarotta
ID: 1128029
Please re-read my comment of Friday, October 30 1998 - 03:39AM.
I think you had your answer then.
Good luck,
Ralph

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Author Comment

by:atlanta102998
ID: 1128030
Thank you Ralph, but the strange thing is I can play audio on the cd-rom drive very well. It hasn't got that sound then.. So I don't know what's wrong with my cd-rom, but I know that there's something that causes the problem.
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