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DNS vs DHCP

Can someone give me a CLEAR and SHORT explanation of what are DNS and DHCP exactly for and how to? I am very confused with. My OS is NT Workstation and I don't understand the use of DNS/DHCP on a LAN or on Internet. I don't have access to a NT server. I have a book on NTWS but the chapter about TCP/IP is very short and doesn't explain, they just say I need them to configurate my TCP/IP.(!?)In the mean time, to connect  to my ISP I don't have a DHCP neither a DNS number...
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wirefram
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wirefram
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tcalesaCommented:
DNS is used to resolve an IP address to a HOST name.
DHCP is a repository of IP addresses that are given out to copmuters.

If you need to connect to an ISP, you will set up the Dial Up Networking connection using DHCP (in your isp dial up connection this is called server assigned IP address) You may also have to enter a DNS address as well, this depends on your  ISP.

In short, you don't need to install either DHCP or DNS to be a client to an ISP.
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wireframAuthor Commented:
For what I understand, in a LAN, the DHCP is supposed to attach MY computer to a server(?!) if there is a server able to configurate my computer through my TCP/IP, otherwise I have to type the IP number of the server I want to be attach(?).

In a LAN, Why do I need DNS for?


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sugdenjCommented:
tcalesa gave you what you wanted (short answer).  DNS is a protocol to translate (look up) an IP (Internet Protocol) address (like 204.71.177.71) given a "friendly" name (like www.yahoo.com).  DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a method to configure a computer (host) for internet communications when the computer is turned on.  The configuration can change each time, it's set by a DHCP server.  When you call an ISP, you usually use PPP (point to point protocol).  Bear with me.  you can optionally let the ISP set your IP address and DNS server address when you connect.  Most ISPs want to do this.  Most LAN administrators want to do this too, since managing this stuff is easier.  So DHCP doesn't attach you computer to a server.  It lets a server set your computer up for internet communications.  In a LAN you need to point to a DNS server so you don't have to refer to other machines by IP address instead of www.xxxx.yyy.com.

A little longer version, but tcalesa answered first.
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wireframAuthor Commented:
I agree, I'd give my points to tcalesa except this option is no longer available....

I apologize, I asked for a short answer but I should have ask for an answer long or short because I know the definition of DNS/DHCP I just don't get the exact needs for in a LAN.

DHCP let a server set up MY tcp/ip for Internet connection but if I don't want an Internet connection, let say I am connected to servers and workstation in a company, what is the DHCP use?

You say "in a LAN I need to point to a DNS server", why do I NEED it? What happened if I don't enter any DNS info ?

I am even more confuse, I must be missing something....




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tcalesaCommented:
If all you want to do is connect to an ISP you don't need to worry about it. The server at the ISP will handle DNS/DHCP for you.

If you have a LAN running TCP/IP as the protocol, then you may want to configure these services on your server. Say you have 200 clients and all need the TCP/IP stack, It is much easier to assign the addresses by giving the server a range of addresses to assign to the workstations, the DNS server will then take the addresses and turn them into more recognizable names. (over simplified, but pretty accurate)

I'll just repost the answer.
DNS is used to resolve an IP address to a HOST name.
DHCP is a repository of IP addresses that are given out to copmuters.

If you need to connect to an ISP, you will set up the Dial Up Networking connection using DHCP (in your isp dial up connection this is called server assigned IP address) You may also have to enter a DNS address as well, this depends on your  ISP.

In short, you don't need to install either DHCP or DNS to be a client to an ISP.
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wireframAuthor Commented:
Thanks a lot!

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