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mount: fs type iso9660 not supported by kernel  ???

Posted on 1998-11-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
When i try to mount my cdrom i get this error:

mount: fs type iso9660 not supported by kernel  ???


what does this mean and how do I fix it.  My CDROM is a MATSHITA CD-ROM CR582.

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Question by:richiev69
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olvo earned 20 total points
ID: 1631576
I went recently through the same pain, and the problem is not in the type of CDROM but in the kernel built. the solutions I found were:

1) Rebuilt the kernel. That is simple, run "make config" from /etc/src/linux, you need to
have all the source code for Linux. Very good info in "Linux Kernel HOWTO".

or

2) Download the linux kernel 2-35, I think it is the latest, already compiled.

I check the list of supported CD-ROM (ones needing some special handling) and
yours is not listed. Good it should be ATAPI complaint, one less problem...

 

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