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Books on VC++ 5.0

I am new to VC++ and want to learn from the basics.Will you suggest me some books .How do i go about it like first Win32,or MFC ,etc
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ramask
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ramask
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Answers2000Commented:
Petzold for introductory Win32 API (C style)
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556156766/answers2000limit

Prosise for introductory MFC under Win32
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556159021/answer2000limit
or
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1572316950/answers2000limit

[second is new edition out Dec 98 - first link sometimes has intermittent problems - sorry]


Sorry don't have a C/C++ introductory book suggestion (yet)


Some reviews on this site (still partly under construction):
www.wildcomputer.com/books_ccpp.htm
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
OK
Where should I start from is it from Win32 or MFC or simultaneously?
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
I'll check that out
Where should I start from is it from Win32 or MFC or simultaneously?
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
I'll check that out
Where should I start from is it from Win32 or MFC or simultaneously?
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
Sorry by mistake comment was added three times
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Answers2000Commented:
If you are new to programming here are your routes

(A) EITHER
1. Learn C - start with a C tutorial - write __text__ programs (printf type stuff)
2. Win32 - get Petzold - this gets you into Windows
3. When ready learn C++ - against start with text mode programs
4. MFC - get Prosise book
This is the route most of us took - simply because this was the historical order stuff came out.  Probably this can be short-cut by the alternative

(B) OR
1. Learn C++ - start with text mode programs
2. Learn MFC - Prosise book
3. Once you get interested in how MFC works - start figuring out Win32 API (MFC builds on top of this, so it is really good background knowledge to have) - Petzold is the starter book for this



If you already know programming in C or C++ this should tell you which route will get you into Windows programming quicker.

If you have no previous experience programming, then I would suggest route (A) unless you are really smart - as it's too much to take on in one go.

In the long run if you want to be a good (and therefore well paid) Windows programmer you should aim to be able to understand  MFC, Win32, C and C++.  All are essential to the top programmers.  Most large professional apps for Windows are written with MFC, however the best MFC programmers know some API info (the more the better) as knowing what's going on under-the-hood helps solves problems and fix bugs quicker (plus MFC does not cover all Windows functionality).

Finally I suggest by learn - I don't mean to learn every function/class (nobody ever learns all of these!).  The point is to understand the concepts, the key functions/classes (and preferably know their names - this comes from familiarity) and where/how to (a) approach problems, and (b) look for more information when you need it.

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ryaneCommented:
Go to...

http://www.amazon.com

.Search for Visual C++ 5

If you are new to C/C++ programming in general, I would highly suggest learning C++ from cover to cover.  This is important if you plan to do windows programming using MFC and the AppWizard.  

C programming isn't worth squat when using MFC's.  There are several good books that start and end with C++ and assume you are starting at a beginning level. Example:

(The Waite Group http://www.waite.com/ezone)
C++ Interactive Course by Robert Lafore

I also recommend any books by Osborne. Example:

(Osborne http://www.osborne.com)
C++ The Complete Reference (Third Edition)

Extremly good book.  It has a C section, a C++ section, and references on both.  It also covers the new international standard for C++.

-ryane
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
Those books are good.I know programming in C/C++. Since I want to learn VC++ and get an MCP  I asked that question.How do I go about getting a better hand in VC++ ?Which way to start MFC or Win  32 API? Where do I get free tutorials/materials  on the net?
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ryaneCommented:
Sybex: Mastering Visual C++ 6
Osborne: Visual C++ 6 From the Ground Up

http://msdn.microsoft.com
http://devcentral.iftech.com/Learning/tutorials/

It's good to have an idea of how MFC's function, so you might want to skim through learning the API first then move into MFC's.  Basically, when you program using MFC's, all of the true guts and hard work is done for you and/or hidden.  MFC's are simply a bunch of classes and functions to make programming faster and easier.  If you don't know the basics of Windows programming, then MFC's will just confuse and frustrate you.

-ryane
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ramaskAuthor Commented:
Thanks ryane.

Regards
Ramadurai S K
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ryaneCommented:
Sybex: Mastering Visual C++ 6
Osborne: Visual C++ 6 From the Ground Up

http://msdn.microsoft.com
http://devcentral.iftech.com/Learning/tutorials/

It's good to have an idea of how MFC's function, so you might want to skim through learning the API first then move into MFC's.  Basically, when you program using MFC's, all of the true guts and hard work is done for you and/or hidden.  MFC's are simply a bunch of classes and functions to make programming faster and easier.  If you don't know the basics of Windows programming, then MFC's will just confuse and frustrate you.

-ryane
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