RAISERROR

I've defined error message 60001, using sp_addmessage.  An event has occurred in my stored procedure which
causes  the following lines of my code to run
   RAISERROR (60001, 16, 1) WITH SETERROR
   RETURN

On my (Database) side everything went according to plan - the process stopped and I have verified that
@@error contains 60001.  Now

1.  On the application developer's side (they'll be the ones calling the stored procedure) will they just
need to check to verify that @@error = 0 when the procedure terminates to know that the process was
successful?
2.  On the database side, is there a way to see the current contents of the sysmessages table?
3.  I know that state in an error message has no direct relevance to SQL server - has anyone found a
particularly good use for it?
scarlettAsked:
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aliciaamCommented:
Just under Master database run:
select * from sysmessages

Good question: the state is set to false or true depending upon you want that error to be logged.

if you want to change the state of an error run:
sp_altermessage 60001, with_log, false
If you need to alter the state of a message on the sysmessages table you could use that sp.
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scarlettAuthor Commented:
Thank you for answer question #2.  

I still urgently need an answer for question #1.

My question (3) about state had nothing to do with changing the state - it was an inquiry to determine if anyone has put this feature to good use and would like to share this information with a new SQL programmer.
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aliciaamCommented:
When an error is raised, the error number is placed in the global variable @@ERROR, which stores the error number most recently generated by the system.  So... nothing guarantees you that @@error will be zero, it could be different than your 60001 but not necessarily zero.
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Microsoft SQL Server

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